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    Joined: Dec 2007
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    crisc Offline OP
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    Sorry to start another post so soon but I need advice for resources.

    In response to an e-mail that I received from DS6's 1st grade teacher today about his bad behavior I wrote:

    ...I know that you have 20 other kids that need to reach minimum standards and that DS6 would prefer one on one
    attention. I also know that you truly can't teach at his academic level while keeping up with the rest of the class. DS6 knows this as well.


    It now appears I have really ticked her off. She has requested a meeting for next week as she states:

    I think we disagree on what actually is DS6's "academic
    level" and what is appropriate for him developmentally to be doing in the classroom.

    I have had many children over the twenty years in the classroom like DS6. Yes he is bright. But he is also a six year old boy.

    I would like to meet with you as soon as possible to get this worked out. I am not comfortable with the fact that somehow DS6 "knows that I can not teach at his academic level." I believe this is an inappropriate message to be sending a 6 year old. Please let me know which day next week you will be able to come in.


    I would think his test scores would be enough to show that addition/subtraction is not going to cut it for math and simple chapter books are not going to work for reading group.

    Maybe this has been our issue all year--she might actually believe that DS6 is "not that smart". It's probably a great reason why we have not had any harder work. It's also true that DS6 does feel that he is not going to get harder work from this teacher. I'm really not sure what to tell her.

    I plan to have DS6 complete some more complex math sheets this weekend--what else should I bring? I feel like I shouldn't to prove anything to this woman. She seems to have already made up her mind about him.

    Does anyone know of any above level testing I could request for a 6 year old?


    Crisc
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    Ok. I have been here before. Take a step back and a deep breath. You have definitely pissed her off. I did the same exact thing. Email was much of the problem. Schedule the meeting but don't meet with her alone. Have the principal and a GT specialist there as well. Bring in examples of his work. This is why we took a WISC in the first place. I scheduled and got the results inside of a week. The school stopped giving me a hard time when they saw my dd's verbal scores. You have to speak their language but don't let them use his behavior as an excuse not to teach him. Say something like, "yes we understand there are behavioral issues and we are working on it. Maybe we are not that far apart here and if we can find a solution to the academic issues it might make solving the behavioral issues a bit easier." Try not to belittle or antagonize them. They are all you have right now and unless you want to homeschool or pay for private you do not want to spend the rest of his school days fighting with teachers and admininstrators, although you might have to anyway. Bite your tongue and try to be diplomatic remembering that a good outcome will benefit your child.

    I'm sorry for you. It should not be so hard.

    best to you and good luck.

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    Crisc, DD8 had both the WIAT and Woodcock Johnson. I preferred the WJ. Also, it's pretty standard to school to use the Woodcock Johnson, so it's a good bet for their comfort level. They really can't discredit the results if they use it themselves.

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    crisc Offline OP
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    DS6 has already had the WJ-III last year. His scores in math qualified him for DYS. I would think that would have an impact. Maybe since the school didn't do the testing they don't trust the scores...

    We also have no GT specialist at our school--no program either. I guess I could ask for the Principal or Vice Principal to come.

    I do need to take a deep breath. I am ready to reply back: DS6 is not "bright". He is gifted--even if you don't like the word. But I won't. smile

    Last edited by crisc; 01/14/09 04:51 PM.

    Crisc
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    Okay, while your note to the teacher makes sense, it's less than diplomatic. Perfectly acceptable to post that stuff here, but some of your word choice is a little loaded from teacher perspective.

    Judging by the teacher's response you have royally pissed her off. I should know, I seem to have a very special talent for pissing of the elem ed teachers.

    The teacher will be on the defensive at the meeting, nothing to do about that now. I wouldn't expect to accomplish anything major at the meeting, just work on trying to get back in a positive light. Live to fight another day......

    I have used the term: natural learning level. Anytime you can figure out which terms are "loaded" from the teacher perspective and eliminate them it's a good thing. I have trouble with this, but have come to find it makes a huge impact in whether or not you have success.
    My first boss loved the fact that I had: "Uncommon common sense". I guess the lack of common common sense can be pretty problematic for me, especially in these school dealings. smile

    When is the meeting? Good luck and tell us how it goes. If you can think of anything I can help you with, feel free to p.m.

    Neato

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    crisc Offline OP
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    Thanks 'Neato,

    I guess academic level is a term I should NEVER use again. These kids should come with a manual. smile



    Crisc
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    Crossposted. You are justified. He's not *just* gifted if he has math DYS scores, he has special needs. It's getting to the place where the teacher can see that and not feel she is being challenged or that you are being elitist.

    Is it possible to get there? Yes. Am I totally there with my school yet? No.

    But our principal is supporting my girls and it's a huge step in the right direction. I made the mistake, though, of getting in a pissing match with the K teacher, who has been teaching there a very long time. She plays the sweet little old lady card but is crafty as a fox. I suspect some of the issues I have with current teachers stems with her....
    Fair? no. It's just the reality and I have to deal with it. But it hasn't stopped me from advocating and we are starting to see some of the fruits of of labor, so to speak.

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    Crossposted again! Don't beat yourself up. You should of heard some of the stuff I said. I thought it was great........Oh boy!



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    Has teacher seen the Woodcock Johnson test?

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    Originally Posted by crisc
    ... as she states:

    I would like to meet with you as soon as possible to get this worked out. I am not comfortable with the fact that somehow DS6 "knows that I can not teach at his academic level." I believe this is an inappropriate message to be sending a 6 year old. Please let me know which day next week you will be able to come in.


    Maybe this is a good thing...
    (not that you ticked her off, of course)

    But at least she wants to meet with you quickly. I wonder if there is a way for her to see that you aren't "sending him the message". Sounds to me like he figured the situation out on his own...

    This could be a great opportunity to demonstrate for more than one person at the school where your son is really at academically. Even though you may need many more meetings (or years even, as others have said.) Now you've got her attention! wink

    Last edited by EastnWest; 01/14/09 05:14 PM. Reason: added stuff
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