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    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Mom2277 Offline OP
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    I have six year-old twins who are completing their kindergarten year. My hope is to describe aspects that MAY suggest testing and applying for Davidson is worthwhile or not.

    I'll start with my son. My son taught himself to read and currently reads on a junior high level. I learned he knew how to read when I corrected his assertion that a duckbill platypus is venomous. He pulled out an animal encyclopedia written for junior high/high school students and showed me how it said male duckbill platypuses have a venomous spur. Then, he pouted, incredulous at my ignorance.

    A child psychologist told me his language skills and problem-solving skills indicated he was gifted. (He had dictated a story for her about a "caterpillar army putting gum in his esophagus, so he wouldn't get adequate nutrition.") She tested him using WASI, and he scored 141 on the FSIQ. She highlighted that the score likely did not reflect his abilities because he gave silly answers and wasn't very cooperative with what seemed very boring to him.

    He concentrates intensely and for an inordinate time on topics of interest. He will work assiduously on assemblying 1000 piece lego kits and complete them within less than 2 days without assistance.

    He does well in math, working on about the third grade level. He is working through Beast Academy 3B.

    His twin sister excels in math the same way that her twin brother excels in reading. She is working on about 4th grade math. She comfortably has nearly completed Beast Academy 3B and is working on Life of Fred fractions. Most striking, she seems to have an incredible aptitude for math, learning it quickly and easily and devising successful and novel approaches to solving mathematical problems.

    She did not teach herself to read, but went from BOB books to a solid third-grade reading level (reading Geronimo Stilton) books this kindergarten year.

    Her language and vocabulary always have garnished remarks. As a two-year old, she screamed in fury if a referred to her purse because the barrel-shaped purse was a "cylinder." The child psychologist explained she may not know the answer to every question in the tests she intended to administer, and my daughter readily agreed, "That's because I'm just six-years old, not omniscient." (We delayed the WASI administeration because of medical issues).

    Both children are incredibly intense and do have sensory issues/overexcitables.

    A child psychologist who sees my son because of some adjustment difficulties following numerous stressful changes told me my children were "freakishly intelligent" and that they would ceiling her tests. She considers it unusual for five year-olds to play Monopoly, not Candyland.

    I really would appreciate feedback on whether getting the testing required for Davidson and assembling the required portfolio likely would be worthwhile. As a single parent, home schooling my children, finances are tight. I do feel challenged in how to help them develop their skills and would like them to be able to access learning opportunities that I otherwise couldn't provide.

    Thank you!

    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Yes, I would. BTW, wasn't it the WISC-IV test they took?

    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Mam Offline
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    You have the portfolio for both of them already set with what you describe, so I would definitely test.

    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Joined: Sep 2010
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    FWIW, my fraternal twins have identical FSIQs on the WISCIV. For some reason that really threw me for some time, so be prepared for that outcome.

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    Mom2277 Offline OP
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    Thank you so much for the responses. The test my son took was the abbreviated intelligence test, WASI. My daughter has yet to take it. We had to reschedule due to asthma flares, illness, etc.



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