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    Joined: May 2011
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    There's some great advice on this thread!

    I want to add something I read from a syndicated family psychologist - he recommends children's bedtimes be when *parents* are ready to stop parenting. He has a completely different attitude about interacting with your child - his mother booted him out the door and told him a kid's life is entertaining themselves (something like that) - and felt no concern about his self-esteem!

    My older son has a good friend who's always been this energetic, and last summer he worked helping with tree thinning. His boss said he did the work of 2 grown men consistently. Now how adaptive is that???


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    Originally Posted by LinCO
    There's some great advice on this thread!

    I want to add something I read from a syndicated family psychologist - he recommends children's bedtimes be when *parents* are ready to stop parenting. He has a completely different attitude about interacting with your child - his mother booted him out the door and told him a kid's life is entertaining themselves (something like that) - and felt no concern about his self-esteem!

    I really, really like what the psychologist had to say about bed times! That makes sense : )

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    This is from a hummer/singer, as well as mother of a hummer. They say his are tics, mine is just an inner tune.
    Have you thought about using a physio ball, those big exercise ball. Leave it slightly underfilled so that it takes energy to keep balanced on it. It will build core strength but also provides an non irrataining way for energy to be released. I have two in my classroom. You can see kids just bopping along as they work. It provides another stimulus. She is so young that she would use the small one. When she sits her legs should make a 90 degree angle for the correct size.

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    Originally Posted by aculady
    Verona,

    Activities that help children improve proprioceptive processing and sensory integration can help with some forms of low tone.

    Here is a link that has some good activities that help improve proprioceptive processing for younger children. The proprioception activities are about halfway down the page.

    Dynamic movement orthoses, Therasuits, Kinesio tape, and other techniques for increasing proprioceptive input can be used over time to help improve low tone.

    Generally, repetitive stimulation that helps increase the level of proprioceptive input can help train the brain to perceive and respond to small changes in muscle length and eventually help decrease the degree of the low tone, if it is due to a processing problem.

    HTH

    Thanks Aculady. I can't get your link to work though -- could you post it again? And thanks to PassthePotatos for the input about exercises for hypotonia as well. We haven't done much for proprioceptive input, except he was wearing a weighted glove for writing for a while, so maybe I should look into this more.

    My DS (almost 7) has had issues with hypotonia, balance and co-ordination since he was a baby. He now has a dx of motor dyspraxia , into which they bundle all these issues. They consider his hypotonia to be mild to moderate. We have looked into other possible causes of the low tone, since many of the professionals we saw didn't see him as a "classic" dysrpraxic and thought there might be something else going on. So far, nothing has shown up. He is making good progress with increasing his endurance and amazingly learned how to ride a two wheel bike this spring (yay!).

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    The link should be fixed now. Congratulations to your DS on learning to ride the bike! My son learned at 11, and loves it.

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