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    Originally Posted by Dude
    Originally Posted by binip
    There are differences amongst the highest performers, which are consistent. Believe me, it bugs me more than anyone because I was that girl--the one in all those high math classes--who couldn't believe how nonchalantly and confidently the boys took the tests. I'm sure their confidence (aloofness? unemotionality as teens? I don't know) affected their scores positively, and my insecurity, my scores negatively. I hate that it's a trend, because I'd like to think it's just my insecurity. But if you look it up, the top 5% or 2%, you will see that it is very consistently that the boys outscore the girls, and that differences between LA and math are greater, the further right you go on the bell curve.

    From the OECD paper I linked earlier (which unfortunately you now have to google for, since their server uses temporary access tokens)

    Quote
    In four out of the six best-performing countries and
    economies overall, there is little or no gender difference in mathematics performance. Among these, in the partner country and economies Chinese Taipei; Shanghai, China and Singapore, at least 10% of girls attain proficiency Level 6 in mathematics; in no OECD country, except Switzerland, do even 10% of boys reach this level.

    Granted, with only 4 out of 65 countries represented here, and all of a similar culture, that does beg the question of whether there isn't some cultural phenomenon in play here that is pushing girls further.
    Or whether East Asian IQ of 105 and the relative strength of East Asians in math means that even if there is a sex difference in math among East Asians, the overall level of math ability is high enough that girls do well.

    China is a country where the preference for males is strong enough that the sex ratio is skewed by sex-selective abortion. "Gender equity" may be worth pursuing for its own sake, but I don't think it explains differences in the math achievement gap by sex across countries.

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    Originally Posted by Bostonian
    Or whether East Asian IQ of 105 and the relative strength of East Asians in math means that even if there is a sex difference in math among East Asians, the overall level of math ability is high enough that girls do well.

    Better than their males, in fact.

    Originally Posted by Bostonian
    China is a country where the preference for males is strong enough that the sex ratio is skewed by sex-selective abortion. "Gender equity" may be worth pursuing for its own sake, but I don't think it explains differences in the math achievement gap by sex across countries.

    It certainly can't explain the difference if you're going to treat a math achievement gap as an a priori assumption in the face of data that directly contradicts it.

    China's sociological gender selection could be an explanation for its results, but the same cannot apply to Singapore or Chinese Taipei (Taiwan). It also wouldn't explain the results for some of the varied cultures that demonstrated superior math performance for females, such as Sweden, Qatar, and Trinidad and Tobago.

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