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    Joined: Oct 2015
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    I think we've got a problem in hand - DYS DS7 doesn't like to read. He doesn't like to read instructions when working on math problems. He tends to ask me to read the question to him but I usually let him do it himself. When we go to the museum, we ask him to read the information on the exhibit, he does not want to read it. He would wondering around until we ask him come back and finish reading. He doesn't pick up a book and just start reading unless we ask him to do so. I asked him why he doesn't like to read. He said that reading is boring, even on the subjects that really interest him. He's rather find a video to watch and learn than read about it on a book.

    This is the kid who was obsessed with alphabets, learning the longest word in the English dictionary, learn numbers in different languages and having so much fun playing word puzzles and games. He's at 99% on VCI on the WISC-V test. But he doesn't like to read! He doesn't have trouble skipping words or lines and reads fluently out loud. I am just puzzled.

    He's tested >99.9% on VSI on the WISC. Does it have anything to do with him not interested in reading text? What can we do to help increase his interest in reading?

    Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.

    TIA!

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    Is there something perhaps going on with his vision?

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    Hi ajinlove,

    How does he do on reading achievement tests? Is he possibly just too active to want to sit still for long periods of time? (which actually might not be terribly unusual for a 7-year-old boy)? Is there anything he has enjoyed reading in the past? Have you tried the Life of Fred books or Beast Academy (books about math)?

    DD's very bright friend was found to have stealth dyslexia at about this age, but unless you are seeing signs, this might not be anything to worry about.

    My DYS DS7 is impatient with words in math, but he has been forced to deal with them as the teachers have been giving him quite a few challenging word problems in school. The biggest problem I observe with him is a failure sometimes to CAREFULLY READ the details of the problem. I jokingly read the problem ssslllloooowwwwlllyyy to point out to him that he has missed a crucial detail, despite the fact that his math was otherwise fine (ok, sometimes he doesn't appreciate this). This is the kid who drives me bonkers because he wants to solve everything in his head and sometimes does so correctly, before I am finished working the problem alongside him. Other times, though, he'll simply make a silly mistake this way. He likes to do math QUICKLY.

    My DS, I think like yours, almost prefers to do math problems to reading. Despite a very high VCI and very high reading achievement scores (DYS-level reading and math on the WIAT), he cannot seem to plant himself still for as long as DYS DD did at the same age...he is NOT hyper, but quite physically active. Most of his reading occurs at night when he is pretty tired. I plant sports books, the sports section, National Geographic Kids books on topics he likes around the house for him...sometimes it works. He has managed to read some challenging books this year. I don't know that he'll ever read as much as DD did/does, but he is a different child!

    Hang in there! wink

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    There's been some good discussions about kids avoiding reading, or avoiding books at their level, which you might find helpful. Unfortunately, although I remember an extensive one (from last summer, I think?), I can't find it. Can anyone else remember, or track it down? Here's another one, though, that might be of interest.

    http://giftedissues.davidsongifted....6228/Advanced_reader_but_won_t_move.html

    With the level of avoidance of reading you're seeing, though, I would definitely want to be really sure there wasn't some kind of hidden learning issue. A high VSI wouldn't have anything to do with not wanting to read - but it could be a huge help in allowing a seven-year-old to read fluently by sight words only, without being able to decode. A combo of high VCI/ VSI/ memory makes it possible to memorize one's entire reading vocabulary as a set of individual pictures to recognize as words (ask me how I know this). It's possible to read this way - and a few kids in this board do it very well. But it's usually exhausting, painful, and to be avoided where possible.

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    ConnectingDots,

    I don't think he has a vision problem. I suspected that but he doesn't skip words or lines while reading. He's a pretty fluent reader. He does occasionally have ticks that he blinks his eyes too frequently, but he's back to normal after a few days or a couple of weeks.

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    Can he read lists of nonsense words? DD's friend struggled with this and this was one of the first clues to parents.

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    Loy58,

    He took the MAP test (K-2) last fall and he was at 99%. I think he can understand or comprehend if he pays attention to what he's reading. He's not hyperactive and can sit still for a long period of time if he's playing an educational APP on iPad or doing games on puzzle books. We are doing Beast Academy books right now. He seems reading it himself fine but I never really asked him questions besides doing the workbook. He loves jokes or riddle books. Those are usually few sentences and he thinks those are fun. Beast Academy maybe an easy read for him too as they are short reads in the comic format.

    I just read about signs of stealth dyslexia, I don't think he has that. He's very strong with phonics and decoding. He can read fluently out loud and no problem spelling a new word with sound it off.

    His teacher is going to give him a project to do this quarter. Since he loves geography, she is going to ask him to pick a state or country and do a research about the place. This will help him read and write what he finds out about this place. BTW, he doesn't like to write either. Often he would say I don't know what to write. Sigh....

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    When you say list of nonsense words, do you mean words that are put together as a sentence but don't really mean anything? If that's the case, I can try that with him but I don't think he would have problem...

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    Platypus101,

    Thanks for sending the link. I suspected vision issues and Dyslexia but I don't think I am seeing signs. He's great with phonics ever since he was 2, 3 years old. He can spell words just by sounding off. He can sound off a new long word with not much struggle. He has no problem with writing and in fact has very good handwriting for his age. What other signs of stealth dyslexia or dyslexia I am missing here that may be a concern?


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    DS9 does not like to read either, but he is the kid who scores 143 on the PRI and 2 STD lower on VCI. He had vision issues, and had gone through vision therapy, which helped but not as much as I would hope for. He just picked up Harry Potter 2 weeks ago and likes it. Unlike his older brother who could finish reading the entire book in one day. He is much much slower, as expected

    DS9 reading comprehension just picked up recently, which I am not entirely sure if it is due to vision therapy.

    Like others who have commented, I would not rule out vision issue. Does he easily get tired after reading a few pages? Does he skip lines and forget his space while reading? How is his posture and handwriting?




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