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    Joined: Apr 2011
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    AEH we were deeply scarred by Nemo too... Possibly me and my parenting more than my children. It was the first time I had ever taken one of my children to the cinema and I had naively believed all the people who told me how wonderful it was....

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    I had a really hard time with Mother Gothel in Tangled. And Toy Story 3. All these films for kids are getting so dark. However I used to be fascinated by fairy tales, and those were all really really dark. Anderson especially. My mom used to say Anderson was grimmer than Grimm wink

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    Originally Posted by LAF
    I had a really hard time with Mother Gothel in Tangled.

    Man, she totally had me questioning my parenting at every turn.

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    Originally Posted by HowlerKarma
    Originally Posted by aeh
    The "scary movie" known as Cars. The moment when Lightning McQueen wakes up on the highway and can't find Mack. And many, many years later, we still haven't gotten past the opening scene of Finding Nemo.


    For us, this is the scene in a particular Teletubbies short in which one Tubby is being chased by the other tubbies (for refusing to share the some item of clothing or something, as I recall). We had to fast-forward through it when DD was tiny-- her distress was pretty extreme.

    (And no, in my defense, we did NOT actually encourage our 13-18mo DD to watch a lot of television... until she was virtually immobilized for two months by an RSV-penumonia one-two-punch, that is... at THAT point, Teletubbies were fair game as a means of keeping her quiet and resting.)


    I was curious-- I looked it up after asking DD about it-- she still remembered it well.

    (Recall-- this is my 15yo DD, and this was WELL before 9.11.01-- about a year prior, in fact)




    Even then, my DD hated the idea of others forcing their will upon someone else and found it intolerable. Wow. This is still one of the few things that really rouses her to overtly aggressive/agitated behavior; stripping another person of agency/rights/autonomy. I hadn't ever thought of it in those terms, but this has apparently been a thread that stretches back to even THEN. shocked
    And in our case, the thread is high security needs (not nearly as altruistic as your dd's!)--can't remember if I already told the alarm story: around age six
    child: "what's that little light?"
    parent: "the motion sensor for the house alarm"
    child: "it goes on if there's someone moving in the room?"
    parent: "yes"
    child: "how can it tell the difference between us and a bad person?"
    parent: "it can't. we just disarm it when we're at home"
    child: "but I don't know the alarm code!"
    parent: "that's okay, we wouldn't leave you home alone without someone who knew the code"
    child: "what if something happens to both of you?"
    --from here we head into a series of questions that cannot be satisfactorily answered without describing our whole estate/guardianship plan. Oh, and assurances that the appointed guardian would absolutely know how to fly across the country, acquire and drive a rental car (even if it's an unfamiliar make and model), use a map to reach our house, and, most importantly, TURN OFF THE ALARM!


    ...pronounced like the long vowel and first letter of the alphabet...
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    Will not show Kung Fu Panda 2 ... ever. I saw it years ago and was a little freaked out. Kung Fu Panda 1 was well received by DS4 though. Do agree that the falling out of of Mack on the interstate scene was pretty upsetting.

    Oddly we have watched BBCs "Planet Earth" and the giant great white sharks jumping out of the water and eating cute seals scene was greeted with nonchalance. (The artic fox stealing the egg from the nest was met with horror though - go figure).


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    My kids must be calloused and unfeeling because nothing cinematic phases them.

    One has a pretty good anxiety disorder in real life sitautions....flush a toilet or ride an elevator at age 8, panic attack, but Harry potter movie, cartoon movies, super hero movies...no problem.

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    Cookie, DD has no problem with cinematic violence or emotionally distressing content-- she watched The Boy in Striped Pajamas without a major problem when she was 7 or 8, I think, and Schindler's List not that long after that. Harry Potter was no problem. smile

    It was only before she was able to distinguish fantasy/reality well (really, <2yo) that we saw this effect. That's why I mentioned it as a goofy thing that appeared, and then submerged, only to reappear later on in other forms.



    It wasn't until she was around 3-4 that she realized that some things on screens ARE real, and some are not.



    Schrödinger's cat walks into a bar. And doesn't.
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    My DD's situation is opposite cmguy's DS. Extreme violence in fantastic situations doesn't bother my DD9 in the slightest. Sometimes she'll even laugh at it, and root for the bad guy. But realistic fiction, with characters she can identify with... no. And don't even think about discussing disturbing current events.

    DD was constantly asking us, "Is that real?" beginning around 2yo, so that's the major reason.

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    Oh my-- DD is going through 10 years' worth of stashed schoolwork and related detritus, and I kept a LOT of weird stuff-- asynchronous stuff-- from when she was little.

    One coloring page (from a 'social studies/occupations' coloring book):

    picture is of a young woman in a dentist's chair, with the dentist leaning toward her, instruments in hand, both of them smiling jovially there at the happiest dental practice on earth.

    She carefully colored a few things in some strange psychedelic shades, added a cup dispenser to one corner, and (gulp) added captions.


    The woman is asking "Do you LOVE ME??"

    and the dentist is responding with; "YES!"

    Creepiest cartoon EVER from my 4yo.

    She had not yet seen Little Shop of Horrors, but this nicely explains why she has such an affinity for Steve Martin's role in the film. {sigh}



    Schrödinger's cat walks into a bar. And doesn't.
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    DS ran up to me after school with a little girl from his class and introduced her.

    "Mom, she wants to be a scientist but she doesn't know anything about science!"

    The little girl was all owl-eyed nodding along with what he was saying.

    "Can you call her mom and set up some play dates? She wants me to teach her stuff but it is going to take a long time!"


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