Gifted Bulletin Board

Welcome to the Gifted Issues Discussion Forum.

We invite you to share your experiences and to post information about advocacy, research and other gifted education issues on this free public discussion forum.
CLICK HERE to Log In. Click here for the Board Rules.

Links


Learn about Davidson Academy Online - for profoundly gifted students living anywhere in the U.S. & Canada.

The Davidson Institute is a national nonprofit dedicated to supporting profoundly gifted students through the following programs:

  • Fellows Scholarship
  • Young Scholars
  • Davidson Academy
  • THINK Summer Institute

  • Subscribe to the Davidson Institute's eNews-Update Newsletter >

    Free Gifted Resources & Guides >

    Who's Online Now
    0 members (), 169 guests, and 41 robots.
    Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
    Newest Members
    ddregpharmask, Emerson Wong, Markas, HarryKevin91, Harry Kevin
    11,431 Registered Users
    May
    S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4
    5 6 7 8 9 10 11
    12 13 14 15 16 17 18
    19 20 21 22 23 24 25
    26 27 28 29 30 31
    Previous Thread
    Next Thread
    Print Thread
    Page 2 of 2 1 2
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 36
    L
    Junior Member
    Offline
    Junior Member
    L
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 36
    My older kid (DS nearly6) is extremely inflexible. Any surprises, smallest changes to routine will lead to tantrums. We have recently started occupational therapy to overcome it. The OT also includes a listening program called ILS (integrated listening systems) and I feel even after a few times that it has made a difference already.

    I like the sabotage program, we have used that a few times as well with the favorite cereal having run out :*) or mistakenly putting the wrong ingredient on the sandwich (when he was hungry and we had to run out of the door).

    I am so glad that this forum exists and I am not feeling that I am the only one that has a kid with this extreme stubborn/ inflexible behavior. :*)

    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 1,032
    N
    Member
    Offline
    Member
    N
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 1,032
    Oh yes, I definitely have at least one of those! DS8 has a most astonishing array of opinions about the world for someone who has almost no experience in it! And DD4 follows right in his footsteps, so I'm not sure if it's really her or just the nearness of brother. Everything has to be "just so", and it's a national catastrophe if something different is about to happen.

    To be fair, they do come by it naturally.

    It's just so frustrating when I can't get him interested in a book or movie or game that I know he would like, because he has this "thing" against it for no apparent reason. I still have many of my books from when I was a kid, and now my kid doesn't want to even look at them, because he's "not a fiction kind of guy". Arrrgh!

    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 7,207
    Member
    Offline
    Member
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 7,207
    Everyone in my family could be described as inflexible - particularly when stressed.

    I've had great improvement with

    Transforming the Difficult Child Workbook: An Interactive Guide to The Nurtured Heart Approach by Lisa Bravo, Howard Glasser

    I love making a big fuss when DS or DH does even the littlest flex and praising their flexibility. I like those irrefutable moments of strength - and lecture on and on about it, even when I see DS start to squirm.

    Smiles,
    Grinity


    Coaching available, at SchoolSuccessSolutions.com
    Joined: May 2010
    Posts: 341
    D
    Member
    Offline
    Member
    D
    Joined: May 2010
    Posts: 341
    HA! I have one of these! I left my 4yo DS with my mother today crying because I threw out his old carseat last night. The carseat that he has not used in over 6 months.
    My DD6 has always had a "bring it on" kind of personality. She'll tackle any task or activity. DS just told me that soccer was "too hard" on Saturday.
    You know, you think you've got one kid figured out and the next one throws you for a loop!
    I am definitely going to start trying some of the ideas here. The other thing I am going to keep doing is to not coddle him. If a carseat/whatever needs to go, it needs to go. It will be done in broad daylight with little apology and just enough explanation.
    SO glad I'm not the only one!

    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 553
    I
    Member
    Offline
    Member
    I
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 553
    Oh, yeah. There was the time when D (now 16) was about 4, and I made chocolate chip pancakes for breakfast (big treat). But... we were out of fat free Coolwhip (what they usually have with them), so just this one time I said they could have vanilla ice cream with them instead. Older D was thrilled, but the four year old threw a fit and wouldn't eat it. Just because it wasn't what she was used to.

    A couple of tricks we have tried over the years:
    - Bribery - D did not want to learn to swim, but she did want dance lessons. We made it a condition... get through level 4 of swimming, and you can have the dance lessons. She did it. Hated dance once she got there, but that is another story smile
    - When they start something new, let them go for a one session try-out of you can arrange it. D started fencing this year. She really wasn't sure about it, so I asked the club if she could come one time and check it out before we commmited for a full quarter. She did, was comfortable enough to return, and now really loves it.

    Page 2 of 2 1 2

    Moderated by  M-Moderator, Mark D. 

    Link Copied to Clipboard
    Recent Posts
    psat questions and some griping :)
    by SaturnFan - 05/22/24 08:50 AM
    2e & long MAP testing
    by aeh - 05/16/24 04:30 PM
    Employers less likely to hire from IVYs
    by mithawk - 05/13/24 06:50 PM
    For those interested in science...
    by indigo - 05/11/24 05:00 PM
    Beyond IQ: The consequences of ignoring talent
    by Eagle Mum - 05/03/24 07:21 PM
    Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5