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    #198136 08/08/14 05:43 AM
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    There are book threads for various age ranges, but I'd like to start one for adults (and those of adult mental age). This year I have read a few biographies -- "Steve Jobs" by Isaacson, "Gates ..." (1994) by Manes and Andrews, and "Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist" (1995) by Lowenstein. The Jobs biography was great, and the Gates biography while good left me looking for a book to bring me up to date on Gates and Microsoft. My 10yo, who likes to program, read the Jobs book twice and some of the Gates biography.

    Lowenstein's biography gives an insight into how Buffett thought about business and investments but also his thoughts on politics and philanthropy. There are interesting slices of Midwestern Americana, for example the story of Rose Blumkin. Lowenstein's "When Genius Failed: The Rise and Fall of Long-Term Capital Management" (2001) is also good. "The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life" (2009) by Alice Schroeder is a more recent and longer biography of Buffett that I may try next. Buffett is known for his essays on business and investing, which explain complicated topics to laymen, and I may read "Berkshire Hathaway Letters to Shareholders, 2013".

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    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

    New Seeds of Contemplation.



    What is to give light must endure burning.
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    Here are some of my favorites:

    Neal Stephenson's Reamde which ties with The Baroque Cycle books for my favorites of his books

    Ruth Ozeki's A Tale for the Time Being

    An oldie but goodie, Christopher Moore's Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal




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    indigo #198613 08/16/14 02:39 PM
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    Originally Posted by indigo

    I should point out that plants have a much more limited vocabulary than people.

    JonLaw #198614 08/16/14 03:10 PM
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    Originally Posted by JonLaw
    Originally Posted by indigo

    I should point out that plants have a much more limited vocabulary than people.

    Then it ought to be a quick read.


    ...pronounced like the long vowel and first letter of the alphabet...
    aeh #198616 08/16/14 03:34 PM
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    Originally Posted by aeh
    Originally Posted by JonLaw
    Originally Posted by indigo

    I should point out that plants have a much more limited vocabulary than people.

    Then it ought to be a quick read.

    They speak in chemicals, so there's a lot of translation work.

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    How Not to be Wrong: The Hidden Maths of Everyday Life by Jordan Ellenberg.

    Won't be a surprise to the maths among you but helping me keep up with DD. Quite funny in parts too.

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    Oh, why did that spam?

    Jordan Ellenberg wrote How not to be wrong. It's subtitled The hidden maths of everyday life.

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    I liked this one for serious reading http://www.amazon.com/Life-Natural-History-First-Billion/dp/037570261X

    But I also really enjoyed The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan (and it was a quick read). Farm City by Novella Carpenter was good too.

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