School Administrators as Politicians

Posted by: thx1138

School Administrators as Politicians - 10/12/15 07:06 PM

A gifted advisory center recommended I avoid using the word gifted when I approached my local public school principal about my gifted sons needs. In such a world, parents of gifted children need to carefully plan their interactions with school authorities. I have often felt confused, but have worked to construct a general theory that accounts for their behavior.

School principals (administrators, headmasters, admissions directors, etc.) are ultimately, essentially, and primarily politicians. And politicians are not known for telling the truth. They serve many masters and broker decisions across them. And like any politician, they must regularly deceive their constituents, as they serve: themselves, their spouse, their board, the teachers, the parents, the students, and the future of the institution itself. Just because you’re funding the whole party, by no means are you and your child the first priority.

On top of this, most parents face a monopoly (at best an oligopoly) of school choices. With public schools, you have no choice but to fund your local school with your taxes. You are handed one school and one administrator. I believe you would even help their budget if you pulled your children out into private school. And even with private schools, they often demand signed commitments, and paid tuition far in advance. In most places there are few gifted private schools on offer. You and your child are quite expendable, when there is a line of parents waiting to replace you. Net net this increases the power of the school administration, and decreases the power of the individual parent/student. The imbalance is unhealthy. Power corrupts.

I advise gifted parents to carefully study and practice the Japanese concepts of honne and tatemae. Any time you set foot on school grounds, or interact in any way with anyone from the school, you must put on your tatemae facade. You, and the principal, may say you are sharing your true inner feelings, but it is naiveté itself to really do so. So while a school may be ostensibly “parent run” and paid for, in reality people will grab whatever power they can and hold onto it. Again we see the dichotomy between appearance and inner reality.

Both meaningful feedback and true community in a school thus become rather unrealistic. Politician-principals really don’t want a truly strong parent community, as it would empower a group that is already far down on the priority list, making their job more difficult. PTA meetings become a farce in which only the naive really voice any of their concerns. The administration may ignore you until you go away… or they may make an example or scapegoat of you. I suppose its possible they are well intentioned and (believe they) know more about gifted education than any parent, but more likely they don’t actually want all that much feedback, and you only endanger yourself by revealing your inner thoughts (honne). If you are right, it means you have exposed the administration as wrong. I now look carefully at the parent community as a way of appraising a school.

All one can really do is hope that your child has good teachers and healthy peers. That is ultimately where they spend their time. In theory a MAP test can reassure you if they are actually learning anything. While I like the theory and the goal, in practice some experts here feel MAP becomes less useful for gifted children.

It often seems the goal of the administrator is to manage the parents. Ideally parents can be ignored. The nail that sticks up gets hammered. Or managed, by the carrot and the stick. For example, the principal might control teacher assignments. One begins to feel that their child is a hostage. I’ve had a principal intervene and prohibit a teacher from writing a recommendation 6 months after we changed schools. I’ve had admissions directors begin a meeting about admitting a sibling, by lecturing me about their power to “counsel out” a student. I have had another principal apologize that my DS was denied admission (as if the fish doesn’t stink at the head) while suggesting that I could always reapply. The alert reader will see the carrot and stick in operation.

To summarize, my advice is to understand all school administrators as essentially politicians, understand your place in their pecking order, study tatemae, and consider home schooling. I didn't mean for this to come across as snarky, but I believe most gifted parents have had some bitter experiences. Am interested in your reactions to my framework.
Posted by: HowlerKarma

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/12/15 07:35 PM

In spite of occasional difficulties, I am in no way bitter about my experiences with school administrators. No, they did not always meet my child's needs. No, they did not always act in good faith or treat me kindly or with respect.

However, I came into the arena with my expectations already very firmly in check. I expected that K-12 administrators would behave in many of the same ways that university administrators do-- and so they do.

I expected that what I had learned through my mother (a lifelong primary teacher) of administrative behavior would be the case. And so it is.

In short-- of course they are politicians. So are most managers, no matter the venue.

The good ones, the ones that are there for the right reasons (and not for power or because they aren't competent to be managers elsewhere, or teachers in actual classrooms)-- they seek to serve the LARGEST NUMBER of students with the fewest dollars, and to have a way to SHOW that they have done something concrete or meaningful with that money.

Now, the devil is in the details, however. "We bought iPads for every kindergarten student" is far more "concrete" to the powers that be than "we staffed two more classrooms in each school, and now kindergarten class sizes are down 10%, which research shows is more effective, particularly for students who are behind or ahead of their peers."

The latter doesn't, er-- sell. Ergo, doing that with the same sum of money will not get MORE MONEY for next year.

This isn't malice-- it's often hard-bitten pragmatism that's grown as an exoskeleton to hide the deep desire to do BETTER, and the hopelessness that the entire system is sometimes rigged against it in every possible way.

They do the best that they can. Sometimes it's not very good.

Just remember-- to you, your child is the ONLY child.

To a teacher, your child is one child in his/her classroom of children-- important in his/her own way, to be sure-- but still, one of a number of children with equal rights and demands.

To an administrator, your child is likely impersonal-- not really a PERSON, so much as an idea, or a part of an idea, that is-- "students." You as a parent are merely part of an idea of "parents."

The ideal parents are involved, supportive of education, and not looking for special anything beyond what all children have offered to them. The ideal parents have ideal children, who are well-served by typical offerings in typical classrooms, run by typical teachers and surrounded by typical classmates.

THAT is who administrators are trying to serve. The tails of the distribution are problematic. They cost more. Period-- and if you meet their needs, you also have the problem that other parents will want to know why you aren't doing special anything for THEM and THEIR child...


It really is a bit of a no-win situation for administrators.

That is helpful to remember. smile

This also doesn't touch upon the administrators who are there for less-than-noble reasons. But I have found that those are the minority-- perhaps 10-15%.
Posted by: blackcat

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/12/15 08:57 PM

I have the same cynicism you have, thx. I have come to the conclusion that it's not really about the kids, it's aobut their jobs and money and professional relationship first, kids second. Another parent told me that she witnessed DS's IEP manager and teacher yelling at each other in the hallway, with the principal standing there dumbly. They were arguing about DS and what he should be doing for math (the IEP manager was on our/DS's side and the teacher wanted DS to do grade level math). Of course, no one ever told me what that argument was about, or even that there WAS an argument, other than the parent. I brought it up and the topic was quickly changed. No one wants the parents to know what is really going on. I called the principal and he said "I'm sure the two of them can work this out, they are both dedicated educators." Ummm, thanks so much for your profound leadership ability!" I found it remarkable that there was even a teacher in the school willing to go to bat for DS, because it's their jobs and reputation on the line. My past experience is that teachers/staff members just go with the flow and accept whatever opinion someone else tells them to have, but the principal's role in this particular school was so undefined that the teachers decided everything on their own. His role as "politician", for whatever reason, was to have all the teachers on his good side and dismiss parent concerns unless the teacher was on board. He had no idea what to do when two teachers disagreed, so decided to just let them duke it out in the hallway.
Posted by: thx1138

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/12/15 09:12 PM

Yes, another important point, for the administration, the school budget is a zero-sum game.

Let's spell out how this specifically affects gifted children. Basically we are seen as asking for more resources. In a zero-sum game this takes away from other stakeholders. Since gifted represent 1 or 2 % of parents, which is not an important constituency to begin with, they would rather we just go away. You can get a soft-shoe shuffle out of them, but little action. I would not mind an extension of this discussion into any best practices or success stories in a negotiation with a school.

Consider for example the vaunted Palo Alto Unified School District. They used to IQ test. They would call some parents in and say "well it looks like your child is gifted." Parents would then ask what happens next, and they would say "well, nothing, but we thought you'd like to know". I guess maybe they had tracking, but no gifted program. Now however PAUSD has improved the process. They no longer even bother to test. They just say that, like Lake Wobegone, all their students are gifted. Problem solved!
Posted by: Thomas Percy

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 05:53 AM

Incentive really matters. In China, high school teachers are often given bonus and rewards when their students got into the most selective universities. Guess what kids got the most attention?

This is true for the lower schools as well because each level feeds into the next level of magnet schools who produce the most competitive students later. I would say the most advanced students always get the most attention.
Posted by: mecreature

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 06:51 AM

Originally Posted By: Thomas Percy
Incentive really matters. In China, high school teachers are often given bonus and rewards when their students got into the most selective universities. Guess what kids got the most attention?

This is true for the lower schools as well because each level feeds into the next level of magnet schools who produce the most competitive students later. I would say the most advanced students always get the most attention.


I would say this is true for most private schools also. In middle school most will post where they kids will go to high school and high school will post what universities there students are attending.

When ds was in public elementary everything seemed 50/50. DS was subject accelerated 2 years, this was easy. When it came time to get creative on what to do, meetings got pretty heated on what needed to happen. Some teachers had great ideas and were willing to go the extra mile and some just sat there quiet. We had a lot of meetings.

I found it very interesting in the 4 years we were there 3 of my ds following teachers either quit or were moved. The school district also fired 2 High Ability curriculum coordinators in that time. Both were great but one was particularly informed about giftedness. She loaned us A Nation Deceived and Developing Math Talent. She was also a big fan of Carol Dweck. When ever I read Indigos posts I picture this lady in my mind. I would swear they are the same person.

She never stood a chance in this district.
Posted by: indigo

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 07:39 AM

Originally Posted By: thx1138
A gifted advisory center recommended I avoid using the word gifted when I approached my local public school principal about my gifted sons needs.
Unfortunately, yes. In case it may be of some help, this recent thread discusses some options to substitute for the word "gifted".

Originally Posted By: thx1138
Politician-principals really don’t want a truly strong parent community, as it would empower a group that is already far down on the priority list, making their job more difficult. PTA meetings become a farce in which only the naive really voice any of their concerns. The administration may ignore you until you go away… or they may make an example or scapegoat of you. I suppose its possible they are well intentioned and (believe they) know more about gifted education than any parent, but more likely they don’t actually want all that much feedback, and you only endanger yourself by revealing your inner thoughts (honne).
The web is ripe with anecdotes and lived experiences which support your observation, including the posts of one school district's informed residents. Free from any hint of bitterness or cynicism, the posts are insightful, raise awareness, and help pierce the fog of naiveté.
Two general thoughts which have been shared with me regarding awareness and advocacy, and which I will pass along:
1) If ignorance is bliss and knowledge is power, where are you on your bliss-power continuum?
2) "Be wise as serpents and gentle as doves" - ancient sacred text

This recent post points to the climate change in US public schools.
Posted by: Cookie

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 07:43 AM

That's funny because as far as I know indigo has never indicated his or her gender. I picture indigo as a he.
Posted by: indigo

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 08:00 AM

Originally Posted By: mecreature
Both were great but one was particularly informed about giftedness. She loaned us A Nation Deceived and Developing Math Talent. She was also a big fan of Carol Dweck. When ever I read Indigos posts I picture this lady in my mind. I would swear they are the same person.

She never stood a chance in this district.
Originally Posted By: Cookie
That's funny because as far as I know indigo has never indicated his or her gender. I picture indigo as a he.
Please note that the board rules include: Try not to post any information that will allow others to identify you, your children, or anyone else.

Essentially, no doxing.

Please help avoid negative impacts to members of the gifted community, and do not use the forums to speculate on the identity of posters. smile

Originally Posted By: thx1138
One begins to feel that their child is a hostage.
Agreed. There are recent threads which discuss retaliation. While parents are not to blame if a teacher or school retaliates, a fact-based and unemotional approach to advocacy may sometimes be effective for gaining what is needed for a child's education, while avoiding pushback.
Posted by: thx1138

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 08:32 AM

I should add that parents may like to study basic negotiating skills before any discussions with school administration. One book I like is Secrets of Power Negotiating by Roger Dawson.

Thomas, perhaps we have something to learn from China. Though education in Asia is often based on tests, that are based on memorization. Now that so many facts and data are a click away on the internet, I don't see much value in memorization, but rather on analysis. It could be said though that the established power structure doesn't want people thinking too much.
Posted by: eco21268

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 09:02 AM

Originally Posted By: thx1138
I should add that parents may like to study basic negotiating skills before any discussions with school administration. One book I like is Secrets of Power Negotiating by Roger Dawson.

And sometimes, there are those who come to the table draped in dysfunction, who refuse to hear anything that threatens their closest-held belief systems...

I researched/studied/read everything I could about negotiation/advocacy and still made a monumental muck of my efforts for my son. Some systems are just rigged. My hunch is these are rarely rigged in favor of the children affected.
Posted by: eco21268

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 09:30 AM

Originally Posted By: Cookie
That's funny because as far as I know indigo has never indicated his or her gender. I picture indigo as a he.

I believe indigo is male. Or, perhaps, female.
Posted by: suevv

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 10:33 AM

I'm almost definitely sure that indigo is a color. A lovely deep but pure blue - like the Marianas trench on our world map.

I'm still trying Charmspeak on our public school administrators and teachers. "You a talented, dedicated professional, eager to take on the challenge that is my son's education." So far it's working a little bit. To be fair, it's because I think they actually might be talented, dedicated professionals. So I only have to Charmspeak the second half.

HK said: "To an administrator, your child is likely impersonal-- not really a PERSON, so much as an idea, or a part of an idea."

The first few times I met with the principal, I actually put a picture of DS on the table in front of us. Probably sort of annoying, and I think the principal might have been a bit offended at first. But honestly I think it helped.

HK also said: "The tails of the distribution are problematic. They cost more. Period-- and if you meet their needs, you also have the problem that other parents will want to know why you aren't doing special anything for THEM and THEIR child."

At base - this is why it's easier for administrators to serve kids on the other end of the bell curve from ours. Everybody gets the feel-good of helping a kid who needs it, and there are no Tiger parents clamoring for their kids to be classified as needing THAT sort of special ed.

I actually feel for the teachers/administrators trying to deal with this special snow flake environment where parents are so horribly competitive with each other, using their kids as weapons. Ick. You couldn't pay me enough.

And FYI - this is why I aim for sneaky, not very observable accommodations for DS: E.g., he gets regular breaks in the library, which I fully intend to transform to learning time with the math specialist, e.g. Or an opportunity to drop in to above grade level things going on, like special science or tinkering events. "No, no - that's not acceleration at all. Pay no attention, ye Tiger Parents. Nothing to see here." And oh yes, I'm busy, busy, busy supporting the library fund raising effort because I do want that librarian on my side!

Bits and pieces that help in little ways that I hope add up to a decent chance for DS.
Posted by: ashley

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 10:47 AM

Originally Posted By: suevv

And FYI - this is why I aim for sneaky, not very observable accommodations for DS: E.g., he gets regular breaks in the library, which I fully intend to transform to learning time with the math specialist, e.g. Or an opportunity to drop in to above grade level things going on, like special science or tinkering events. "No, no - that's not acceleration at all. Pay no attention, ye Tiger Parents. Nothing to see here." And oh yes, I'm busy, busy, busy supporting the library fund raising effort because I do want that librarian on my side!

Bits and pieces that help in little ways that I hope add up to a decent chance for DS.




suevv, this moved me a lot - because how much you care about getting your son an education appropriate for him shows. It also makes me sad, because why is the public education so terrible that it takes so much creativity and perseverance and diligence from a parent of gifted kids to get "something appropriate" for their kids (which is better than nothing at all)?
Posted by: eco21268

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 10:53 AM

Originally Posted By: ashley

suevv, this moved me a lot - because how much you care about getting your son an education appropriate for him shows. It also makes me sad, because why is the public education so terrible that it takes so much creativity and perseverance and diligence from a parent of gifted kids to get "something appropriate" for their kids (which is better than nothing at all)?

Moved me, too. Sad that we have to learn all of these back-door methods for something that should be straightforward. Even sadder for those kids whose parents can't/won't/don't know how to do this. smirk
Posted by: ElizabethN

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 11:12 AM

Originally Posted By: suevv
The first few times I met with the principal, I actually put a picture of DS on the table in front of us. Probably sort of annoying, and I think the principal might have been a bit offended at first. But honestly I think it helped.


This is brilliant. I actually did something similar by suggesting that my DD actually start attending 504 meetings starting in 3rd grade. We used to do the first part of the meeting, then bring her in and talk to her about the plan and ask any questions that had come up during the discussion.
Posted by: Thomas Percy

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 12:39 PM

Originally Posted By: thx1138
I should add that parents may like to study basic negotiating skills before any discussions with school administration. One book I like is Secrets of Power Negotiating by Roger Dawson.

Thomas, perhaps we have something to learn from China. Though education in Asia is often based on tests, that are based on memorization. Now that so many facts and data are a click away on the internet, I don't see much value in memorization, but rather on analysis. It could be said though that the established power structure doesn't want people thinking too much.


This is from one of my favorite bloggers on education.
http://oilf.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-stereotype-of-rote-learning-in-east.html

I don't know about if this is true for all subjects. I can tell you school math in China is a lot less rote than the US ever was.
Posted by: AvoCado

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 05:04 PM

This thread is depressing. I'm just gearing up for a big advocacy push but it's so easy to slip back into giving up all hope frown
Posted by: HowlerKarma

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/13/15 09:22 PM

AvoCado, I would NOT assume that what you see posted on this forum in terms of horror stories is necessarily typical for parents advocating for their children.

Based on my other work over the years as a parent advocate and support group administrator, what gets POSTED in message board support groups tends to be between the 80th and ~98th percentile in terms of advocacy experiences. Why not the 99th? Well, because in those cases THEIR ATTORNEY has advised them to shut up and behave while the administrative and civil remedies play out, which includes social media silence.

Occasionally, the rare 1st to 5th percentile story shows up, where a parent basically lands in Nirvana. The rest of us warmly offer congratulations while secretly wondering if they are lying... whistle

Most parents don't get all of what they'd like, but mostly, it works tolerably well, and the people they are working with are also mostly tolerably decent and hard-working.

Our own advocacy journey was not particularly difficult, in spite of having a child that fit-- well, nowhere, actually. Schools were willing to work with us right up to the very bleeding edge of what seemed POSSIBLE-- and frankly, they'd have done more than we thought was wise/prudent in terms of acceleration, even. I had ONE set of very tense meetings in my DD's 9 years as a public school student, and that was disability-related, not GT-related.

DD has pretty out there needs as a human being and student. In some ways, because her second 'e' isn't related to learning, it's easier-- and in some ways, harder, because it is very much unrelated, as a learning package.

Still-- they did it. Of the dozens of administrators I encountered in that nine years-- and in the decades of experience prior to them, let me add-- I encountered just TWO truly Bad, Bad Apples. By that, I mean people who genuinely should NOT have been employed in that capacity, morally, ethically, or otherwise.

One of them was the principal when my DD was a sixth grader-- the one that instructed her teacher to stop talking to her or me in DECEMBER of that year. Yes, that was pretty bad, admittedly. But everyone did quite the happy dance the next year when he wasn't invited back. Ahem. Life went on.









Posted by: Cookie

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 04:28 AM

And some situations of advocacy are this path....

Child needs x (subject acceleration in math), principal says no in meeting, parent doesn't takeno for an answer and keeps advocating, district gt coordinator says yes he does figure it out, figuring it out takes a while, gt coordinator says heck just whole grade skip him, principal gives up and says okay. Grade skip goes fantastic. Principal goes to principal meeting where gt coordinator is speaking about acceleration success stories to principals. No names are used but my son is one of the examples. Principal comes back to school and tells me about meeting and has totally forgotten that he was the naysayer the whole way. Acts like the skip was his idea. Totally ticking credit for what a good idea that was Parent bemused and hopes that future kids have an easier time.
Posted by: blackcat

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 06:36 AM

We don't have a gt coordinator in our district which is probably why we've had so many problems. When we did, DD was accelerated no problem. After that everything kind of fell apart for DS, because there was no coordinator to go to and no one in the district with appropriate training/knowledge in gt. I hear about people having g/t coordinators in SCHOOLS. Um, forget about having one in the school, we didn't even have one in a district of a dozen schools.
Posted by: ConnectingDots

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 06:52 AM

Originally Posted By: AvoCado
This thread is depressing. I'm just gearing up for a big advocacy push but it's so easy to slip back into giving up all hope frown


Don't give up yet! We have had success and now have a fairly easy time of getting our child's needs met. Granted, it took moving child to a school with a great principal, but it worked. I was still anxious about advocating but it was well worth it.
Posted by: cricket3

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 07:43 AM

Originally Posted By: blackcat
We don't have a gt coordinator in our district which is probably why we've had so many problems. When we did, DD was accelerated no problem. After that everything kind of fell apart for DS, because there was no coordinator to go to and no one in the district with appropriate training/knowledge in gt. I hear about people having g/t coordinators in SCHOOLS. Um, forget about having one in the school, we didn't even have one in a district of a dozen schools.


This exactly. We were pushed from person to person, school to school, with no real follow up because no one took responsibility, it wasn't their problem ultimately, etc. We also found that without anyone designated in that position, no one understood the testing or issues, or wanted to invest the effort in trying to understand.
Posted by: blackcat

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 08:32 AM

Yep, supposedly our district has an acceleration policy but the principal didn't even know where I could get a copy (then when I did get it, the policy was unrealistic and other aspects of the policy, for instance schools should provide XYZ in terms of differentiation, were NEVER followed by any of these schools, because the schools don't even know what the policies are and there is no one to coordinate/oversee).

This is what happens when districts try to cut their budgets. They first go to G/T, then they go to special ed (or at least that is what happened with ours).
The district would send parents proposals of what should be cut, including a list of things like "increase class sizes by 5 students", "eliminate all crossing guards on major highways", "Elimate all busing for students living closer than 2 miles to the school", "Cut school psychologists and eliminate school guidance counselors", "Cut intervention programs for reading and math". "Cut funding for G/T." With a list like that, no one is going to argue for the necessity of keeping G/T. The ironic thing is that this is not a poor district by any means, the administrators just badly mismanage funding.
Posted by: suevv

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 10:50 AM

Hey AvoCado,

I just want to also say - don't assume it will all be bad. If you read some of my other posts, you'll see we've had many ups and downs. But all in all, the public school is helping DS7 in lots of ways.

I will admit that he is not challenged academically every day, or even most days. But he has lots of challenges with self-regulation, executive function, etc. And the school has helped a ton with those, and keeps on helping. Lots more good than bad there, even though I know all to well how challenging he can be when he is really struggling.

And lord knows he is having to develop some grit or resilience or a growth mindset or whatever you want to call it. Not about academics. But he tries, fails, and tries again day after day after day to get better at self-regulation and executive function. And when he's calm, he can clearly see a shining trail of improvement behind him - hopefully ahead of him, too.

I think this will serve him very well when it comes time to tackle harder material. Or really - academic material that challenges him at all. Could he be tackling that stuff now? Yes - and we do some at home. So it stays in the context of math is beautiful and science is soul-satisfying and reading is just the BEST way to end your day snuggled up under the covers.

Ack - getting long and I'm not making my point. Let's try this: his future happiness and opportunities will be based on academic firepower AND ability to learn and apply it. The public school is doing much to help position him to learn. Meanwhile, I have zero concern about the firepower, so long as we're keeping the spark alive at home. And FWIW - I have concrete reasons to believe that post-elementary, our district will begin to have lots more flexibility to give him meatier academic challenges.

Day at a time here! But really - it's working well enough that I wouldn't look to change schools. I hope it will be the same for you.

Best of luck to you,
Sue
P.S. And now, having cursed myself, I'll turn up my phone ringer so I won't miss the now-inevitable call from the school!
Posted by: thx1138

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 11:00 AM

And here in California, schools can now apply for GT funds and instead use them to buy band uniforms. And the band played on.
Posted by: ashley

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 12:29 PM

Originally Posted By: thx1138
And here in California, schools can now apply for GT funds and instead use them to buy band uniforms. And the band played on.


Profoundly Gifted Bands grin

On another note, I am pleasantly surprised that California schools can apply for GT funds - the last time that I checked, there was no budget for GT programming at all (one of the biggest factors for me to seek out non-PS options).
Posted by: AvoCado

Re: School Administrators as Politicians - 10/14/15 01:41 PM

Thanks HK, ConnectingDots, Suevv … just a moment of panic there! So nervous … where we are there are no GT coordinators, no programs, no nothing. So after 2 years of politely mentioning things, I had enough and have requested a meeting with a list of concrete demands! But I know I'm just going to get confused raised eyebrows, sigh. Not sure how to negotiate with 'politicians' … :s