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    #92316 - 01/08/11 08:40 PM Homeshcooling
    parentkids233 Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 12/06/10
    Posts: 4
    Were thinking about putting our daughter in homeschooling but we don't know much about it. She gets high scores in her class but doesn't seem to make friends and is almost never excited about going to school. We were thinking about putting her in a private school to. Does anyone know whats better?

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    #92317 - 01/08/11 09:05 PM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: parentkids233]
    aculady Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/31/10
    Posts: 1040
    The answer to that question really depends on your particular family situation. Homeschooling has been pretty successful for our family. There are tons of resources available that allow your child to accelerate and engage with material at her own pace and level in a way that is a lot more flexible than most schools would be.

    Private school didn't work so well for us, as they didn't really have the resources to give our children what they needed in terms of supports for 2e issues, acceleration for giftedness, or even providing a meaningful peer group, but your mileage could certainly vary on that.


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    #92318 - 01/08/11 09:12 PM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: parentkids233]
    CourtneyB Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/12/09
    Posts: 186
    We are using a virtual public charter school with our kids. The local school wasn't willing to help work with us for DS for this year so we opted to go with a k12 charter and ultimately ended up pulling DD5 out of the school and using it with her. They LOVE it and are learning a ton.

    They helped us out right away and DS6 started the 3rd grade math at the beginning of the year and we've been rapidly moving through 1st grade LA and will be done next week. I chose not to have him go to 2nd for LA because I thought the literature portions would be great for him - talking about what he read or listened to is not a strong point with him so I didn't want to skip over that.

    DD will be moving up to 1st grade LA and math in a month or so I think and they are both really really enjoying history as well. Who doesn't love to learn about pharoah's, greek gods, and the trojan war? smile

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    #92319 - 01/08/11 09:40 PM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: parentkids233]
    La Texican Offline
    Member

    Registered: 07/10/10
    Posts: 1777
    Loc: South Texas
    I don't think they have it yet, but I read somewhere they're going to make a virtual school with a suggestion cloud like amazon has after you've bought something. "now that you've learned to count you might also enjoy adding, multiplication, and fractions". I can see it now. "computer, read me the next Shakespeare sonnet."
    _________________________
    Youth lives by personality, age lives by calculation. -- Aristotle on a calendar

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    #92320 - 01/08/11 10:08 PM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: parentkids233]
    aculady Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/31/10
    Posts: 1040
    ALEKS math already does the suggestion cloud, in a fashion, anyway - after you go through an initial assessment, it offers a selection of topics you have the foundations to learn next, and you choose which one you want to work on. As each new topic is mastered, it opens up more choices.



    Edited by aculady (01/08/11 10:08 PM)

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    #92322 - 01/08/11 11:11 PM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: parentkids233]
    La Texican Offline
    Member

    Registered: 07/10/10
    Posts: 1777
    Loc: South Texas
    Awesome. Cool

    Wow.

    Wish I had that when I was in school.
    _________________________
    Youth lives by personality, age lives by calculation. -- Aristotle on a calendar

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    #92350 - 01/09/11 02:43 PM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: parentkids233]
    GeoMamma Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/10/10
    Posts: 487
    We are homeschooling and it works well for us! Homeschooling is always more flexible and more 'customizable' but it does have some sacrifices (primary financial) A good thing to remember is that if it doesn't work out, schools will still be there.

    Do you have any particular questions?

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    #92351 - 01/09/11 02:48 PM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: parentkids233]
    gratefulmom Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/12/10
    Posts: 156
    Loc: N. California
    Deciding between homeschooling and private school involves a lot of factors. Among them...your local resources, your willingness to devote a full-time schedule to this new job, your daughter's willingness to take this type of direction and independent learning from you, other children, social outlets, curriculum choices, financial considerations, etc etc.

    In our personal case, we feel that we have to homeschool because there are no other suitable options for our son. We've tried public school, and the top private schools still can't give him the challenge he needs. We're lucky to live in a community where hs'ing is mainstream, though, and there are dozens of resources for us, along with more than 100 families we now know who are doing this along side us. We have a charter that supports us and pays for all the curriculum (that I choose). I'm also one of those moms who loves my new role, devoting every waking hour to either planning, teaching, or driving the boys to some activity with other kids/moms. Without any one of these factors, I'm not sure that it would be the success that it is for us.

    I think the first thing you might want to do is check all your local homeschool resources (charters? co-ops? homeschool meetups or support groups?). Try to map out what you would truly need to make this successful, and make sure it's all available to you. IMO, even introverted children (not to mention Moms!!) need to get out of the house with other kids at least 1ce-2ce/week, so make sure you have the ability to do that.

    On the other hand, if you have a gut feeling and you're both ready to jump in, I say go for it! The great thing about either decision is that you can change your mind at any time and try the other.
    _________________________
    HS Mom to DYS6 and DS2

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    #92903 - 01/16/11 09:34 PM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: aculady]
    Shift Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 01/15/11
    Posts: 7
    Originally Posted By: aculady
    ALEKS math already does the suggestion cloud, in a fashion, anyway - after you go through an initial assessment, it offers a selection of topics you have the foundations to learn next, and you choose which one you want to work on. As each new topic is mastered, it opens up more choices.



    That sounds really good...I hate overly rigid sequences. I mean, yeah, you need to know electrodynamics and complex analysis before you tackle quantum field theory, or algebra before calculus, and so in these subjects that have many prerequisites, you'll see a long chain...but for any given subject, often there are multiple paths. I think if I had homeschool from a young age (or at least middle school), then I would be academically much farther than I am now.

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    #92976 - 01/18/11 07:37 AM Re: Homeshcooling [Re: Shift]
    Lori H. Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/26/07
    Posts: 982
    Originally Posted By: Shift

    That sounds really good...I hate overly rigid sequences. I mean, yeah, you need to know electrodynamics and complex analysis before you tackle quantum field theory, or algebra before calculus, and so in these subjects that have many prerequisites, you'll see a long chain...but for any given subject, often there are multiple paths. I think if I had homeschool from a young age (or at least middle school), then I would be academically much farther than I am now.


    I am homeschooling my son who is 12. He went to kindergarten at age 5 and was reading at a 5th grade level. He could read his lines from Alice in Wonderland in his musical theater class at age 4. He had been reading since he was 2 1/2. At school all they cared about was that he didn't color in the lines very well. We were told to homeschool. Multiple paths are not tolerated in our public school. There is one path, involving lots of coloring in the lines.

    I think he could be really good in math but he learns math differently than most. When he was tested the month he turned 7 he was working at a 4th grade level. He had learned what he knew from playing games that he found online, but he has motor dysgraphia so he refused to use a pencil and paper during the testing and only used mental math to get the answers.

    I tried to make him do things the way our math books showed it done but he said it was easier when he used his own methods and showing his work was hard because of the mild writing disability that makes his hands tire faster than most people's. I have had to figure this out on my own, with a little help from my friends on message boards, but nobody has a child exactly like mine. Sometimes I think those early years of insisting that my son do math the way the school would require made him hate math and I am trying to undo the damage.

    When my son and I race each other to get the answer on his online math, my son is twice as fast as I am, but only if allowed to do it his way, which is by doing as doing as much mental math as possible and only writing what is absolutely required for him to get the correct answer. I am limited to the way I was taught, which until I had this child, was what I thought the only way of doing things. I have to write everything out to get the answers.

    But there is another problem much harder to deal with than the mild motor dysgraphia. It is his migraine headaches which he gets an average of 4 or 5 days a week when there are a lot of weather changes. I have trouble doing math as quickly and accurately when I have a migraine and so does he but when he was tested by a neuropsychologist she said she didn't think his headache could affect the results of his tests.

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