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    #79132 - 06/28/10 06:15 AM Re: What is this? [Re: aline]
    JJsMom Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/25/09
    Posts: 921
    Originally Posted By: aline
    Girlfriend -- repeat after me... I am weird,I will always be wierd, and it's OK because as I expand my world I will see that I am not alone!


    I love it!

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    #79145 - 06/28/10 07:56 AM Re: What is this? [Re: JJsMom]
    Violet Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/21/10
    Posts: 74
    Originally Posted By: JJsMom
    Originally Posted By: aline
    Girlfriend -- repeat after me... I am weird,I will always be wierd, and it's OK because as I expand my world I will see that I am not alone!


    I love it!


    Weird gifted people/twice-exceptional people rule! ^^

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    #79156 - 06/28/10 09:01 AM Re: What is this? [Re: Violet]
    Lori H. Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/26/07
    Posts: 982
    You sound a little like my twice-exceptional son and we are still trying to find what he really has. He scores very high on achievement tests but because of a mild disability that causes difficulty with fine motor integration which I think is because of a visual processing issue, he would never do jigsaw puzzles and he hated drawing in front of other people because he was not good at it. He has no athletic ability even though he comes from a family with lots of athletic people and his dad played football in the army. I think to do well on the performance section of an IQ test his fine motor skills would have to be better than they are, yet his disability doesn't affect him academically. I am still trying to find out how the lack of jigsaw puzzle ability is supposed to affect someone academically and later on in life. He is slower at things like handwriting and writing out math problems and he can't draw well because of the motor dysgraphia, but he types well. I don't see how it affects him intellectually, but it does lower his performance IQ score.

    He would practice jigsaw puzzles if he could see that it could help him in some way but he feels like it would be a waste of time--he would much rather learn something than do jigsaw puzzles. I think he is better off practicing piano or learning guitar. Our whole family is trying to figure out how this difficulty will cause problems in later life and we just can't see how it it affect him. He did well or better than the other kids in a homeschool circuitry class because he was interested in this.

    I find it ironic that they call it a "performance" IQ when performing is something my son loves to do and he is good at it or he would not have been given a lead role. So I don't really see how IQ is useful for twice exceptional kids if they are smart enough to work around the disability.

    My son was diagnosed with motor dyspraxia a year ago but he is not clumsy, his sequencing ability is very good, and his balance is good so I can't really tell teachers he has this when they can look it up online and see that most of it doesn't fit.

    So my son and I know how it feels to wonder "what is this" and in trying to figure it out, we sometimes see things that are kind of scary, not because he has all the symptoms of the disorders we are looking at, but because he has as many of the symptoms as the thing he was diagnosed with. He has anxiety whenever he has to go to the doctor. It feels like nothing makes any sense.




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    #79163 - 06/28/10 11:07 AM Re: What is this? [Re: Lori H.]
    Violet Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/21/10
    Posts: 74
    Originally Posted By: Lori H.
    You sound a little like my twice-exceptional son and we are still trying to find what he really has. He scores very high on achievement tests but because of a mild disability that causes difficulty with fine motor integration which I think is because of a visual processing issue, he would never do jigsaw puzzles and he hated drawing in front of other people because he was not good at it. He has no athletic ability even though he comes from a family with lots of athletic people and his dad played football in the army. I think to do well on the performance section of an IQ test his fine motor skills would have to be better than they are, yet his disability doesn't affect him academically. I am still trying to find out how the lack of jigsaw puzzle ability is supposed to affect someone academically and later on in life. He is slower at things like handwriting and writing out math problems and he can't draw well because of the motor dysgraphia, but he types well. I don't see how it affects him intellectually, but it does lower his performance IQ score.

    He would practice jigsaw puzzles if he could see that it could help him in some way but he feels like it would be a waste of time--he would much rather learn something than do jigsaw puzzles. I think he is better off practicing piano or learning guitar. Our whole family is trying to figure out how this difficulty will cause problems in later life and we just can't see how it it affect him. He did well or better than the other kids in a homeschool circuitry class because he was interested in this.

    I find it ironic that they call it a "performance" IQ when performing is something my son loves to do and he is good at it or he would not have been given a lead role. So I don't really see how IQ is useful for twice exceptional kids if they are smart enough to work around the disability.

    My son was diagnosed with motor dyspraxia a year ago but he is not clumsy, his sequencing ability is very good, and his balance is good so I can't really tell teachers he has this when they can look it up online and see that most of it doesn't fit.

    So my son and I know how it feels to wonder "what is this" and in trying to figure it out, we sometimes see things that are kind of scary, not because he has all the symptoms of the disorders we are looking at, but because he has as many of the symptoms as the thing he was diagnosed with. He has anxiety whenever he has to go to the doctor. It feels like nothing makes any sense.








    Wow....I know this sounds rather dark, but would this mean that we could be dealing with an orphan disorder? But, seriously, I hope that we find out what it is, and I hope your son will do well. I've got high hopes that, A, some teacher will identify that we are both gifted, and B, what is going on. I will pray for your son, too (my family and I are strong Christians, so we'll probably not forget...).


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    #79481 - 07/01/10 06:44 AM Re: What is this? [Re: Violet]
    Lori H. Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/26/07
    Posts: 982
    The really weird thing is, a lot of people just assume my son has a very high IQ because of the way he speaks and the way he instantly comes up with really good analogies and metaphors, and the way he not only learns concepts very quickly but is able to explain it in a different way, often an easier to remember way by relating it to something else. I think this ability would make him a really good teacher some day. He is so good at explaining things about the computer and electronics to adults who need help, like me, his sister, and my dad. We have had people tell us they think he will be a college professor, a politician, or a lawyer when he grows up and luckily these are professions that a mild disability in motor skills probably won't cause much trouble for him.

    He wants to know how his motor dysgraphia and mild motor dyspraxia could be considered a "learning disability" when he not only doesn't have trouble learning anything, but learns faster than the average kid. His disability only causes a little more difficulty doing physical things and it isn't that he can't do them, he can't do them for as long because of the weaker muscles and the pain. He has some sensory issues and he deals with pain almost daily, yet he continues to learn so well that kids his age in his acting class think he is very smart. Even with his migraines and dealing with the pain from getting used to the brace that kept him from spending as much time as the other kids on doing school type work for the last six months, they still think he is very smart.

    So in our family this "performance" part of the IQ test is kind of a joke. When I have to ask him for help or advice and he looks at me and says "Mom, you really need to learn how to do this yourself" or "Try harder"--the thing I used to tell him when he had a little trouble doing fine motor type activities--not a good thing to tell someone with a disability, I can tell him "Okay you are really smart in some things, but I can color better and do jigsaw puzzles better than you can." It is just that I can't see how that kind of intelligence did me much good. It didn't help me in my jobs as an executive assistant or accountant. My husband can't see where this type of intelligence really helped him in his job as a supervisor. If I am "smarter" in that area what good is it? What am I supposed to be able to do that my son can't do? Well, I guess I did teach myself how to crochet and could make my own patterns and he might have difficulty doing that, but I would gladly trade it for his ability to speak so articulately and learn things as fast as he does. Sometimes it is a little embarrassing to have a child that sounds so much smarter than me. I found out that my straight A's in school meant nothing. Nobody cares that I can color well and do jigsaw puzzles quickly. I could only do things the way I was taught. There is no way I could have taught myself to read or come up with my own way of solving math problems mentally like my son did to avoid writing. He is smarter than I am. He knows it, other kids see it, strangers see it, even public school teachers see it and make comments about it.

    I think twice exceptional kids are amazing.


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    #79497 - 07/01/10 08:31 AM Re: What is this? [Re: Lori H.]
    PoppaRex Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 06/09/10
    Posts: 44
    The doctor is in. My diagnosis? Completely normal.

    Take out the poor memory and low IQ score, add in ADD and I am you, you are me. You can probably change the gender too and add a few years on too.

    Violet, we all are unique just like everybody else. I think many of us have difficulty understanding who we are, what we are, why we’re different and at times, probably wish we were more like “them”. The thing to understand is it really is OK to be different and have all these odd, confusing thoughts.

    But here the IMPORTANT thing: As far as the anxiety regarding what people say about you… There’s only one opinion that counts and that’s yours. If you know that the things are untrue then, while it may be hurtful and it may cause problems with relationships, it doesn’t matter because it’s not true.

    I will say this and please take it seriously! Absolutely NOBODY has the right to demean you by making up things to make you feel bad. You have every RIGHT to make an issue of it. You did not create the issue and it is not your fault and you don’t have to take it! PERIOD. PLEASE, talk to an adult. A parent, a school counselor or a teacher and they WILL help!

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