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    #248765 - 04/26/21 04:09 PM Re: Virginia eliminating accelerated math before 11th [Re: Bostonian]
    Team3 Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 03/12/21
    Posts: 9
    Loc: New York
    Educators will also have to manage the altered student–student interactions that accompany the change. E.g., it's not always pleasant to know the answers in class.

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    #248766 - 04/26/21 05:34 PM Re: Virginia eliminating accelerated math before 11th [Re: Bostonian]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4714
    Welcome, Team3!
    That is an EXCELLENT point.
    smile

    In order to not veer off-topic, I created a new thread discussing: Rather than capping the growth of pupils at the top (for example by implementing a no-acceleration policy), might more be done to bring up the performance of struggling students?

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    #248823 - 05/11/21 12:59 AM Re: Virginia eliminating accelerated math before 11th [Re: Bostonian]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4714
    Possibly this old paper is still pertinent. It debunks several myths previously used to avoid subject acceleration:
    Originally Posted By: paper
    In Search of Reality: Unraveling the Myths about Tracking, Ability Grouping, and the Gifted
    (Ability Grouping and Acceleration) Ellen D. Fiedler; Richard E. Lange; Susan Winebrenner.
    Roeper Review
    , Spring 2002 v24 i3 p108(4)
    Full Text: COPYRIGHT 2002 The Roeper School
    ...
    Myth #1: Tracking and ability grouping are the same thing.
    ...
    Myth #2: Ability grouping is elitist.
    ...
    Not all students have the ability or desire to participate on a varsity sports team, yet I have never heard any school official argue that singling out talented athletes for team membership to the exclusion of others is elitist. In fact, school districts and local community agencies go to great lengths applauding these athletes' efforts and supporting them in their development.
    ...
    Myth #3: Ability grouping inevitably discriminates against racial and ethnic minority students.
    ...
    Myth #4: Gifted students will make it on their own; grouping them by ability does not result in improved learning or achievement for them.
    ...
    Myth #5: Providing heterogeneously grouped cooperative learning experiences is most effective for serving all students, including the gifted.
    ...
    Myth #6: Assuring that there are some gifted students in all classrooms will provide positive role models for others and will automatically improve the classroom climate.
    ...
    Note: "ability grouping" may also be known as cluster grouping by readiness and ability.
    The paper is available on wayback machine, internet archive, here.
    Link - https://web.archive.org/web/20170918201400/http://www.casenex.com/casenet/pages/virtualLibrary/gridlock/groupmyths.html

    Adding a link to related discussion threads, pertaining to limiting student ability to move ahead in math, on the West Coast of the USA:
    1) in the San Francisco Unified School District: Math test doesn't add up
    2) for the entire State of California: http://giftedissues.davidsongifted.org/B...html#Post248829

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    #248976 - 06/27/21 10:52 PM Re: Virginia eliminating accelerated math before 11th [Re: Bostonian]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4714
    Eliminating accelerated math classes is 1st step toward education disaster
    by Marie Richter
    June 27, 2021
    AmericanThinker

    https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/202...n_disaster.html

    Originally Posted By: brief excerpt from article
    Eliminating accelerated math courses for middle and high school students is simply a bad idea with serious consequences. For starters, Virginia will have far fewer students accepted into engineering programs of study at U.S. colleges. Thereafter, Virginia’s engineering universities will be faced with watering down admission requirements for its own state students. Ultimately, Virginia students who are accepted into in-state and out-of-state engineering programs will not be able to compete with students from other states.

    Math classes are the backbone of a high school student’s body of work for those pursuing engineering. The normal sequence of classes offered toward high school graduation is Pre-Algebra, Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2/Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, and Calculus. Accelerated math students can handle Algebra 1 in 8th grade, which puts them on a trajectory to take full calculus (even AP Calculus) before graduating high school.

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    #249072 - 08/04/21 09:37 AM Re: Virginia eliminating accelerated math before 11th [Re: Bostonian]
    BlueFist Offline
    New Member

    Registered: 08/02/21
    Posts: 1
    Look at this incompetence of Virginia removing accelerated math classes before 11th. Remember that American high school diploma is merely slightly harder than GCSEs in UK, per subject while GCSE is taken at 15-16 in UK. So those in UK are basically completing regular American high school diploma two years earlier.

    AP is between AS level and A level in the UK. To put that in perspective 17-18 year olds sit AS levels and 18-19 year olds sit A-levels. You can see that US education needs to catch up.

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