Gifted Bulletin Board

Welcome to the Gifted Issues Discussion Forum.

We invite you to share your experiences and to post information about advocacy, research and other gifted education issues on this free public discussion forum.
CLICK HERE to Log In. Click here for the Board Rules.

Links
DITD Logo

Learn about the Davidson Academyís online campus for profoundly gifted students living anywhere in the U.S.

The Davidson Institute for Talent Development is a national nonprofit dedicated to supporting profoundly gifted students through the following programs:

  • Davidson Fellows Scholarship
  • Davidson Young Scholars
  • Davidson Academy
  • THINK Summer Institute
  • DITD FaceBook   DITD Twitter   DITD YouTube
    The Davidson Institute is on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube!

    How gifted-friendly is
    your state?

    Subscribe to the Davidson Institute's eNews-Update

    Who's Online
    1 registered (cricket3), 0 Guests and 94 Spiders online.
    Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
    Newest Members
    HushHush5309, optimisticmum, oop, Paribus, jemond75
    10955 Registered Users
    April
    Su M Tu W Th F Sa
    1 2 3
    4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    11 12 13 14 15 16 17
    18 19 20 21 22 23 24
    25 26 27 28 29 30
    Page 3 of 3 < 1 2 3
    Topic Options
    #248094 - 02/27/21 07:32 AM Re: How to advocate for child who tries to blend in? [Re: aquinas]
    aeh Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/26/14
    Posts: 3803
    Originally Posted By: aquinas
    Iíve found placing emphasis on the studentís sense of identity as a learner, emotional well being, and self-efficacy is the lens that pays with the educational zeitgeist here, not boredom or poor academic fit.

    Yes! Educators enter the field because they want to make a difference in the lives of children--to inspire and transform, not only academically, but holistically.

    And for your DS and others, the cost benefit analysis could be changed if completing a small selection of easy tasks that demonstrate sufficient mastery to the teacher provided access to progressively more challenging materials (as in curriculum compacting using the test-out approach).

    In addition to external stereotyping, there are also internal pressures, especially among those same populations, to mask gifts in order to blend in with perceived peer and authority expectations. The homeostasis of bias has many dimensions.


    Edited by aeh (02/27/21 07:33 AM)
    _________________________
    ...pronounced like the long vowel and first letter of the alphabet...

    Top
    #248101 - 02/28/21 03:14 AM Re: How to advocate for child who tries to blend in? [Re: aeh]
    MumOfThree Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/11
    Posts: 1678
    Loc: Australia
    Originally Posted By: aquinas
    Iíve found placing emphasis on the studentís sense of identity as a learner, emotional well being, and self-efficacy is the lens that pays with the educational zeitgeist here, not boredom or poor academic fit.


    I work very hard to play to this when negotiating for my kids. I am bashing my head against a brick wall atm and it is really doing my head in. It's quite heartbreaking....

    Top
    #248103 - 02/28/21 07:26 AM Re: How to advocate for child who tries to blend in? [Re: aeh]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4519
    In some schools/districts, focusing not on demonstrable academic skill achieved and pupil readiness ("need") for advanced material in the zone of proximal development... but rather on a student's mental processing and belief systems (such as identity as a learner, emotional well being, and belief in their ability to be successful) may result in extensive journaling assignments examined by school counselors, scheduled pupil visits to the school psychologist, and even unwarranted encounters with child services. YMMV.

    While some, many, or most educators may enter the field because they want to make a difference in the lives of children, I'm also aware of a good number who choose not the field of education, per se, but specifically government school education due to the strong union, salary, and lifelong benefits. On the other hand, some of the most noble teachers I've met have been those who work in private, independent, or parochial schools, where the goals are NOT equal outcomes, but inspiring each student to acknowledge and appreciate differences, and through grit, determination, resilience, and perseverance, be the best they can be. YMMV.

    I'm not currently aware of teacher-provided access to progressively more challenging materials (such as curriculum compacting using the test-out approach), as these, in some areas, may be relics of the past now that a policy of "equal outcomes" has become entrenched, and teachers are evaluated on extensive data collection including grade books which show there are no performance gaps, no achievement gaps, no excellence gaps, among pupils in their classrooms. YMMV.

    I do agree that documenting and demonstrating sufficient mastery may help a pupil be cluster grouped with others of similar ability and readiness. Especially if the pupil is grouped with a higher grade level in which their performance would not show as a "gap" between themselves and other pupils in that classroom.

    In regard to "internal pressures... to mask gifts in order to blend in with perceived peer and authority expectations... homeostasis of bias..." are you referring to a perceptive gifted pupil observing that there is an expectation of equal outcomes for all pupils, and the gifted pupil understands that they are not to exceed this?

    Top
    #248104 - 02/28/21 08:22 AM Re: How to advocate for child who tries to blend in? [Re: indigo]
    aeh Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/26/14
    Posts: 3803
    Originally Posted By: indigo
    In regard to "internal pressures... to mask gifts in order to blend in with perceived peer and authority expectations... homeostasis of bias..." are you referring to a perceptive gifted pupil observing that there is an expectation of equal outcomes for all pupils, and the gifted pupil understands that they are not to exceed this?

    That is one among the possible scenarios. I also refer to GT students incorrectly perceiving peer social norms to be markers of adult or institutional expectations. Or even prioritiing those lower, unspoken peer norms over higher, overt adult expectations. More nuanced examples would include misattributing their own emotional experience to internal failings rather than external failings. For example, when a child thinks they are "bad at" a skill when in reality it is well below their true instructional level, and thus experienced as not engaging (aka, "boring").
    _________________________
    ...pronounced like the long vowel and first letter of the alphabet...

    Top
    #248106 - 02/28/21 09:25 AM Re: How to advocate for child who tries to blend in? [Re: aeh]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4519
    Excellent insight, aeh.
    As usual.
    smile

    Top
    #248111 - 02/28/21 02:53 PM Re: How to advocate for child who tries to blend in? [Re: MumOfThree]
    aquinas Offline
    Member

    Registered: 11/02/12
    Posts: 2415
    Originally Posted By: MumOfThree
    Originally Posted By: aquinas
    Iíve found placing emphasis on the studentís sense of identity as a learner, emotional well being, and self-efficacy is the lens that pays with the educational zeitgeist here, not boredom or poor academic fit.


    I work very hard to play to this when negotiating for my kids. I am bashing my head against a brick wall atm and it is really doing my head in. It's quite heartbreaking....


    Awww, MumofThree, Iím so sorry to hear that! Would it be helpful to discuss? Feel free to PM if youíd like to brainstorm ideas privately. You have my heartfelt support.
    _________________________
    What is to give light must endure burning.

    Top
    #248113 - 02/28/21 11:37 PM Re: How to advocate for child who tries to blend in? [Re: aquinas]
    MumOfThree Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/11
    Posts: 1678
    Loc: Australia
    Originally Posted By: aquinas


    Awww, MumofThree, Iím so sorry to hear that! Would it be helpful to discuss? Feel free to PM if youíd like to brainstorm ideas privately. You have my heartfelt support.


    That is so kind of you! I may well reach out but I have a few too many plates spinning atm. Hopefully later in the week.

    Top
    Page 3 of 3 < 1 2 3


    Moderator:  M-Moderator, Mark D. 
    Recent Posts
    cancelling of humanities studies
    by aquinas
    27 minutes 10 seconds ago
    books for adults
    by indigo
    Today at 11:24 AM
    Analogy: Advocacy as a Non-Newtonian Fluid
    by indigo
    Today at 07:28 AM
    OAGC/ODE Gifted Education under COVID
    by indigo
    Today at 07:04 AM
    Math and discrepancies on WISC
    by aeh
    Yesterday at 03:32 PM
    Davidson Institute Twitter