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    #245788 - 07/01/19 02:12 AM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    Archie Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 12/08/16
    Posts: 48
    I guess those careers involve high fluid reasoning and not so much processing speed or working memory.

    I look at the SATs as replicating a lot of career choices that demand quick decision making and processing, and/or memory demands. I'm thinking of careers like a surgeon or a lawyer. I have an acquaintance who has dyslexia and became a teacher. She constantly teaches the kids to spell words incorrectly and apostrophise plurals. I think in this instance she shouldn't have received accommodations.

    Personally, I could have received accommodations but I wanted to do it on my own to see what I was capable of. I still did really well and I know that I'm being hired for my raw ability.

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    #245790 - 07/01/19 08:23 AM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Archie]
    Kai Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/17/09
    Posts: 647
    Originally Posted By: Archie
    I guess those careers involve high fluid reasoning and not so much processing speed or working memory.

    I look at the SATs as replicating a lot of career choices that demand quick decision making and processing, and/or memory demands. I'm thinking of careers like a surgeon or a lawyer. I have an acquaintance who has dyslexia and became a teacher. She constantly teaches the kids to spell words incorrectly and apostrophise plurals. I think in this instance she shouldn't have received accommodations.

    Personally, I could have received accommodations but I wanted to do it on my own to see what I was capable of. I still did really well and I know that I'm being hired for my raw ability.


    I think that you are imagining a far bigger and wider ranging boost from accommodations than there actually is.



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    #245807 - 07/02/19 07:28 AM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    aeh Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/26/14
    Posts: 3974
    Accommodations are merely tools. They should not change the nature or the underlying quality of response, but allow access to the optimal performance of that person. You still need a skilled person to employ the tools.

    If an individual who may lack the skills to instruct children in spelling and punctuation manages to obtain qualifications to do so, with or without accommodations, that is a separate question. Also, if the particular person referenced previously used accommodations in spelling and punctuation to obtain her position, then she should continue to use them in maintaining her position--in which case these errors would not be transmitted to her students.

    Actually, quite a lot of teachers of language arts at all levels have dyslexia--but they may still be excellent teachers in their field because of their strong language comprehension and expression skills outside of word-level mechanics. Flawless spelling is not a prerequisite for high-level literary analysis. But it helps to be able to acknowledge one's own vulnerabilities, and be willing both to use tools and to receive corrective feedback.
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    #245813 - 07/03/19 12:07 PM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    nicoledad Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/26/12
    Posts: 235
    I'm with Archie on this one. Why not just give accommodations to everyone?

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    #245816 - 07/03/19 03:25 PM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: nicoledad]
    aeh Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/26/14
    Posts: 3974
    Actually, I would agree. If a test is a measure of what it claims to be, the accommodations should not change the nature of the measure. This is the principle behind universal design, after all.


    Edited by aeh (07/03/19 03:26 PM)
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    #245817 - 07/03/19 04:48 PM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    MumOfThree Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/11
    Posts: 1694
    Loc: Australia
    Keyboarding is an interesting accommodation in terms of “everyone should have it”. My children have a physiologically driven handwriting disability. At my eldest child’s OT assessment for senior school exam provisions her handwriting was on the 3rd percentile for speed, her typing above the 99th. It seems natural in my family that everyone would prefer to type their exams. But speaking to friends they’d be appalled if they or their children were required to type over handwriting as their whole approach to planning and writing benefits from a pen and paper. My daughter sits her exams separately so no one is distracted by the noise of her keyboard. A situation where everyone could choose which they preferred would be fair and seems not unreasonable, but would require running two exams in our system, while enforcing 100% typing will harm some people’s outcomes...

    My daughters handwriting might be an issue as a primary school teacher, but there are very few careers where it will matter at all. In most cases her speed and accuracy of typing will be an asset.


    Edited by MumOfThree (07/03/19 04:50 PM)

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