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    #245554 - 05/21/19 08:49 AM Many students get extra time on SAT
    Bostonian Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/14/10
    Posts: 2587
    Loc: MA
    Many More Students, Especially the Affluent, Get Extra Time to Take the SAT
    Responding to parent pleas, high schools grant special test-taking accommodations to growing numbers
    By Douglas Belkin, Jennifer Levitz and Melissa Korn
    Wall Street Journal
    May 21, 2019 10:52 a.m. ET

    At Scarsdale High School north of New York City, one in five students is eligible for extra time or another accommodation such as a separate room for taking the SAT or ACT college entrance exam.

    At Weston High School in Connecticut, it is one in four. At Newton North High School outside Boston, it’s one in three.

    “Do I think that more than 30% of our students have a disability?” said Newton Superintendent David Fleishman. “No. We have a history of over-identification [as learning-challenged] that is certainly an issue in the district.”

    Across the country, the number of public high-school students getting special allowances for test-taking, such as extra time, has surged in recent years, federal data show.

    And students in affluent areas such as Scarsdale, Weston and Newton are more likely than students elsewhere to get the fastest-growing type of these special allowances, known as “504” designations, a Wall Street Journal analysis of data from 9,000 public schools found.

    The special allowances don’t apply specifically to college entrance exams. They apply to all tests the students take while in school.

    The effect, however, is to make these students much more likely to receive extra time or another special accommodation when they take an exam to get into college.

    The 504 designation is meant to give students who have difficulties such as anxiety or ADHD a chance to handle the stress of schoolwork at their own pace and level the playing field. It often lets them have a separate room for test-taking and more time to do it.

    The Journal analysis shows that at public schools in wealthier areas, where no more than 10% of students are eligible for free or reduced-cost school lunches, an average of 4.2% of students have 504 designations giving them special test-taking allowances such as extra time.

    Only 1.6% of students have these designations at public schools in poorer areas, defined as those where 75% or more of students are eligible for free and reduced-cost lunches, the Journal found.

    *******************************************************

    Tests taken with accommodations should be noted as such. That was done prior to 2003, as discussed in an article

    Disabling the SAT: The College Board undermines its premier test
    By MIRIAM KURTZIG FREEDMAN
    Education Next
    Fall 2003

    I oppose the College Board's introduction of "adversity scores", but buying more time on tests by finding a psychologist willing to sign off should also be curbed.

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    #245555 - 05/21/19 04:25 PM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    Wren Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/14/08
    Posts: 1463
    too bad Felicity Huffman didn't know that all she had to do was get a 504.

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    #245556 - 05/22/19 04:04 AM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Wren]
    Irena Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/26/12
    Posts: 1695
    Well, the extra time is not what actually helped the kids in this scandal, right? If you do not know the correct answers, extra time will not do much. The extra time afforded them the ability to actually cheat - i.e., time and space to have someone correct their answers, do the test over for them, etc.


    Edited by Irena (05/22/19 04:05 AM)

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    #245564 - 05/23/19 09:57 AM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Irena]
    knute974 Offline
    Member

    Registered: 09/22/09
    Posts: 677
    Loc: controlled chaos
    Originally Posted By: Irena
    Well, the extra time is not what actually helped the kids in this scandal, right? If you do not know the correct answers, extra time will not do much. The extra time afforded them the ability to actually cheat - i.e., time and space to have someone correct their answers, do the test over for them, etc.


    Thank you for pointing this out. In this scandal, the accommodations were exploited to facilitate cheating. I worry that this scandal will end up further stigmatizing kids who legitimately need time even more than they already are.

    My DYS DD17 has been allowed extra time on tests since third grade because she is dyslexic and dysgraphic. She considers extra time to be a blessing and curse. In elementary and middle school my daughter was in a GT program. She was bullied and teased by other students in the program that she was stupid because she had to go to "the extra time room" when she took state standardized tests. Also, her classes moved on while she was getting her extra time so she had extra homework to make up for what she missed.

    High school has been somewhat better because she can go complete classroom exams or make up work that she missed due to extra time during her off blocks. For college board tests, she acknowledges that she needs the extra time but also acknowledges that her brain is mush by the time she gets to her extra time.

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    #245770 - 06/28/19 02:24 PM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    Anisotropic Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 12/09/18
    Posts: 15
    I don't think that accommodations should be noted on score sends, but over-diagnosis is definitely an issue. For kids who are legitimately 2e, discrimination arising from the practice of "score flagging" would serve only to depress college decisions to a level below that commensurate with reasoning ability and knowledge, which the SAT and ACT are designed to measure. Although time limits exist, these tests are not primarily intended to assess processing speed. Many studies, including one by College Board itself, suggest extremely minimal (on the order of 10 points on the SAT) score improvements for those who do not have a reasoning/PS discrepancy. And in an era when many colleges are willing to accommodate demands for additional time, the practice would seem not only unethical, but also superfluous.
    _________________________
    "The thing that doesn't fit is the most interesting."
    -Richard Feynman

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    #245774 - 06/28/19 06:14 PM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Anisotropic]
    philly103 Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/02/17
    Posts: 66
    Originally Posted By: Anisotropic
    I don't think that accommodations should be noted on score sends, but over-diagnosis is definitely an issue. For kids who are legitimately 2e, discrimination arising from the practice of "score flagging" would serve only to depress college decisions to a level below that commensurate with reasoning ability and knowledge, which the SAT and ACT are designed to measure. Although time limits exist, these tests are not primarily intended to assess processing speed. Many studies, including one by College Board itself, suggest extremely minimal (on the order of 10 points on the SAT) score improvements for those who do not have a reasoning/PS discrepancy. And in an era when many colleges are willing to accommodate demands for additional time, the practice would seem not only unethical, but also superfluous.


    I can't speak to the broad range of issues in play but I do have an anecdote.

    In law school, there was a student with experience in this area and, unbeknownst to the rest of us, she had been receiving additional time for her exams. Now, I don't know if this student had legitimate issues or not so I won't claim otherwise.

    In law school, the exams are timed and they usually require you to identify and evaluate as many potential legal issues as possible. Additional time is very valuable in that setting. Moreso, because law school exams are graded on a curve where only a few students will get As, some will get Bs, most will get Cs, etc., more time can mean the difference between the top of the class and the middle or the bottom.

    The contrast is another student. This student consistently did very poorly in school until he was kicked out at the end of his 1L year. It was only then that he was diagnosed with a learning impairment that would have qualified him for extra time. I often wonder if he would have been able to finish school if he'd been granted the same accommodations as the other student.

    The only difference between them being that she knew to ask and he didn't.

    To that end, I kind of feel that something should be presented that indicates which students have accommodations and which ones don't.

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    #245775 - 06/28/19 06:26 PM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    Archie Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 12/08/16
    Posts: 38
    May I ask what happens to the students who get extra when they get into the workforce and don't get extra time?

    I believe it should be noted on transcripts- it's only fair to future employers and also the future employees.

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    #245776 - 06/28/19 06:54 PM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    aeh Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/26/14
    Posts: 3448
    Just a quick comment: my practice is to explain to students both the pros and cons of extra time (brain turning to mush from exhaustion is why I very rarely recommend 100% extended for standardized testing), their own agency in advocating at every level of education and career, and, more importantly, explain how understanding your own learning profile and accommodations helps you to make informed decisions about school, career, and life choices that allow strengths to flourish and weaknesses not to be obstacles. This includes understanding that applying for a grad program or job where needed accommodations will change the essence of performance expectations may not be the best fit.

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    #245779 - 06/29/19 09:52 AM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Archie]
    Kai Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/17/09
    Posts: 579
    Originally Posted By: Archie
    May I ask what happens to the students who get extra when they get into the workforce and don't get extra time?


    In my son's case, nothing.

    The type of skills demanded by a test like the SAT and those required by his job as a robotics engineer are, apparently, worlds apart.

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    #245783 - 06/30/19 08:54 AM Re: Many students get extra time on SAT [Re: Bostonian]
    knute974 Offline
    Member

    Registered: 09/22/09
    Posts: 677
    Loc: controlled chaos
    Similar to Kai

    My DD is doing an internship at a research university in a STEM field. She has a proof of concept project for a new medical device. Since this is a heavy math and computer project, she has been doing great. She did take a while to plow through a 30 page paper that her professor wrote which was the basis for her project. When she told her professor that she is dyslexic so it might take her a while. He told her, "We are used to that around here. A lot of my students are."

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