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    #241710 - 03/24/18 06:58 AM New research suggests new ways to nurture gifted
    Bostonian Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/14/10
    Posts: 2588
    Loc: MA
    How and why to search for young Einsteins: New research suggests new ways to nurture gifted children
    The Economist
    March 22, 2018

    ...

    Like any assessment, IQ tests are not perfect. But as Stuart Ritchie of the University of Edinburgh points out in “Intelligence”, researchers in cognitive science agree that general intelligence—not book-learning but the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly and so on—is an identifiable and important attribute which can be measured by IQ tests.

    Just how important is suggested by the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY), founded in 1971. Julian Stanley, then a psychologist at Johns Hopkins University, over 25 years recruited 5,000 precocious children, each of whom had intelligence-test scores in early adolescence high enough to gain entry to university.

    Research into how these children did in adulthood has emerged over the past two decades. Of the SMPY participants who scored among the top 0.5% for their age-group in maths and verbal tests, 30% went on to earn a doctorate, versus 1% of Americans as a whole. These children were also much more likely to have high incomes and to file patents.

    ...

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    #241714 - 03/24/18 04:22 PM Re: New research suggests new ways to nurture gifted [Re: Bostonian]
    puffin Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/11/12
    Posts: 2012
    Nothing that new in the article.

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    #241727 - 03/26/18 04:13 AM Re: New research suggests new ways to nurture gifted [Re: Bostonian]
    madeinuk Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/18/13
    Posts: 1439
    Loc: NJ
    I found this interesting (also from the same article):


    Quote:

    Teaching methods that draw on Ms Dweck’s work are now found in schools across Britain and America. The World Bank is running trials of the approach in countries such as Peru. One technique, for example, might see a pupil told to add the word “yet” to their statements, as in “I can’t do long-division—yet.”

    However, a recent meta-analysis suggests that interventions based on growth-mindset are less effective than their hype implies. The study suggests that the effects of interventions drawing on the idea have no effect on the typical student’s outcomes and at best a small effect on those of poorer students. Other psychologists have struggled to replicate Ms Dweck’s results.

    _________________________
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    #241737 - 03/26/18 04:04 PM Re: New research suggests new ways to nurture gifted [Re: madeinuk]
    puffin Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/11/12
    Posts: 2012
    Originally Posted By: madeinuk
    I found this interesting (also from the same article):


    Quote:

    Teaching methods that draw on Ms Dweck’s work are now found in schools across Britain and America. The World Bank is running trials of the approach in countries such as Peru. One technique, for example, might see a pupil told to add the word “yet” to their statements, as in “I can’t do long-division—yet.”

    However, a recent meta-analysis suggests that interventions based on growth-mindset are less effective than their hype implies. The study suggests that the effects of interventions drawing on the idea have no effect on the typical student’s outcomes and at best a small effect on those of poorer students. Other psychologists have struggled to replicate Ms Dweck’s results.



    It was interesting to see someone admit it. I don't doubt that mindset will improve outcomes - just that it explains all outcomes.

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