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    #241019 - 01/21/18 06:07 PM Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4144
    Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders
    by Matthew Hutson
    Scientific American
    January 18, 2018

    Originally Posted By: article
    Those with an IQ above 120 are perceived as less effective, regardless of actual performance
    ... based on research results published in the July 2017 issue of the Journal of Applied Psychology.

    Originally Posted By: article
    “The wrong interpretation would be, ‘Don’t hire high-IQ leaders.’ ”

    Unfortunately, while the article substantiates that high-IQ individuals may suffer from negative bias against them, it does not explore "why" this occurs. Possibly ongoing future research would reveal this:
    Originally Posted By: abstract
    As the first direct empirical test of a precise curvilinear model of the intelligence-leadership relation, the results have important implications for future research on how leaders are perceived in the workplace.

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    #241020 - 01/22/18 07:22 AM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: indigo]
    Dude Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/04/11
    Posts: 2856
    Agreed, the article misleadingly suggests a "why" that it never provides, it merely determines that the prejudice exists.

    So... let's speculate on why.

    My observation over the last several national elections is this: people often look for quick decisiveness as a proxy for this quality called leadership. They're less likely to spot the fraud as the IQ of the leader increases, because the decisions made by lower-IQ leaders are more obviously flawed and ordinary people can notice.

    As IQ increases beyond 120, the presentation of quick decisiveness begins to decrease, as the higher-IQ leaders realize that there are more factors/consequences involved in their decisions. So they seek out more information, more voices, and appear to be dissembling and ineffective. They make better decisions, and are punished for it.

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    #241073 - 01/27/18 11:02 AM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: indigo]
    philly103 Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/02/17
    Posts: 67
    From personal experience (I own 2 small businesses and I'm the president of the board of directors of another), I've always thought it boiled down to the ability/inability of subordinates to understand the big picture of the leader's vision.

    I vaguely recall Hollingsworth said that a leadership pattern will not form when 2 people are too far apart in intelligence (she said 2 sd's, I believe). Which makes sense - an important part of leadership is getting subordinates to believe in your vision. And that turns on the ability to communicate that vision in a way that they understand. And if a leader is presenting an abstract concept beyond the subordinates' ability to grasp and doing it with vocabulary that the sub's don't know then the chance for full buy in drops significantly.

    If you've ever spoken with a subject matter expert when they're using full technical jargon, you know the disconnect. They're probably 100% correct but the gap in knowledge makes it hard for the listener to connect with what's being presented on a deep level.

    My bet would be that if they studied communication styles within the group of leaders above IQ 130, there would be a correlation between better scores and leaders who used simpler language when communicating with their subordinates.


    Edited by philly103 (01/27/18 11:03 AM)

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    #244220 - 10/30/18 12:18 PM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: philly103]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4144
    Originally Posted By: philly103
    My bet would be that if they studied communication styles within the group of leaders above IQ 130, there would be a correlation between better scores and leaders who used simpler language when communicating with their subordinates.
    Agreed.

    Related article here:
    Science Says This Is the Optimal IQ to Be Considered a Good Leader...
    subtitle: Research shows leaders perceived as the most successful today are only slightly smarter than those they lead
    by J.T. O'Donnell for Inc.
    Click to reveal..
    Originally Posted By: article
    Given the average IQ of any group fluctuates between 100 to 110, the study indicates the optimum level of a successful leader's intelligence is no more than 1.2 standard deviations above the group mean (i.e., an I.Q. of around 120-125). In other words, a leader seen as too intelligent or competent actually struggles more at convincing people of his or her leadership ability.
    Originally Posted By: article
    Talking Over People's Heads = Leadership Failure

    According to Simonton and other researchers working in the field:
    ...overly intelligent leaders tend to put off potential followers by
    (a) presenting "more sophisticated solutions to problems [which] may be much more difficult to understand"
    (b) using "complex forms of verbal communication [and] expressive sophistication [that] may also undermine influence"
    (c) coming across as too "cerebral" making them more likely to be seen as an "outsider" and not "one of us."


    Related post here:
    How are the parents doing? (Jan 2018)

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    #244222 - 10/30/18 02:11 PM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: philly103]
    Alannc44 Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 03/30/18
    Posts: 26
    Originally Posted By: philly103
    .

    If you've ever spoken with a subject matter expert when they're using full technical jargon, you know the disconnect. They're probably 100% correct but the gap in knowledge makes it hard for the listener to connect with what's being presented on a deep level.

    My bet would be that if they studied communication styles within the group of leaders above IQ 130, there would be a correlation between better scores and leaders who used simpler language when communicating with their subordinates.


    No doubt they need to take a course in communication, but the really smart folks I know know when to "code switch". In other words, drop the jargon and make things undestandable to outsiders.

    I too own and run a business (closely held and too much family). We're about to close down after 103 years for either lack of communication or sibling rivalry. I can't decide which. Or, perhaps just my own incompetence. Certainly, I question everything I say or do these days. Paralysis through analysis.

    Thanks for the comments


    Edited by Alannc44 (11/02/18 05:34 AM)

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    #244223 - 10/31/18 04:12 AM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: indigo]
    madeinuk Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/18/13
    Posts: 1440
    Loc: NJ
    I manage bright people and the expectations of not so bright people so I need to 'flex' constantly in my communication style. I used to think that everyone was rational and presenting the facts would make the correct path obvious (where's the rotfl emoji when you need it?). I have since been 'woke' and realize that I had been pitifully delusional.
    _________________________
    Become what you are

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    #244236 - 11/01/18 11:19 PM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: indigo]
    puffin Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/11/12
    Posts: 2014
    People may dislike them but the current crop of decisive idiots are not what humanity needs.

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    #244238 - 11/02/18 05:34 AM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: indigo]
    Alannc44 Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 03/30/18
    Posts: 26
    We need a 'like' button.

    Top
    #244241 - 11/02/18 12:51 PM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: indigo]
    LazyMum Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/09/15
    Posts: 105
    I'd like to know if it's a modern thing. Did we ever, historically, like leaders that we thought were smarter than us? (I hope so, because maybe we can get back to that point) Or did we never like them but just never had much of a choice because we accepted that the system nominated/promoted smart folks?

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    #244245 - 11/02/18 03:54 PM Re: Article: Why People Dislike Really Smart Leaders [Re: indigo]
    puffin Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/11/12
    Posts: 2014
    I think historically we thought leaders were "better" than us and maybe didn't question as much.

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