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    #232789 - 08/10/16 07:26 AM Texas boy, 12, preps for life at Cornell
    Bostonian Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/14/10
    Posts: 2593
    Loc: MA
    http://www.ithacajournal.com/story/news/local/2016/08/08/texas-boy-12-preps-life-cornell/88312740/
    Texas boy, 12, preps for life at Cornell
    by Nick Reynolds
    Ithaca Journal
    August 8, 2016

    Quote:
    If he finishes school on time, he could be the youngest Cornell University graduate ever.

    Jeremy Shuler, the 12-year-old son of two aerospace engineers, will be heading to Ithaca this fall by way of Lubbock, Texas, as a member of the class of 2020. He will major in engineering, the same degree his father and Lockheed Martin employee Andy did when he attended Cornell in the 1980s. If he finishes on time, Jeremy could be the only 16-year-old to ever finish a degree on time according to Cornell historian, Corey Ryan Earle.

    Though he would not be the youngest college student ever, (Michael Kearney, a child prodigy, graduated from the University of South Alabama at the age of 10; Bard College’s Ronan Farrow entered school at the age of 11, and attorney and Stony Brook alumna Alia Sabur entered school at age 10) Jeremy would still have a leg up on Cornell’s youngest graduates, several of who graduated at the age of 18.

    His mother, Harrey, who has her doctorate in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas-Austin, homeschooled Jeremy and assisted him in his studies. By age 11, Jeremy had completed all of his high school courses and enrolled at Texas Tech University Independent School District, which allows students in K-12 to complete high school at their own pace.

    Jeremy's intelligence was apparent early. At age 10, he placed in the 99.6 percentile for all college-bound seniors that year and aced seven AP exams, receiving college credit in calculus, chemistry, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, statistics, microeconomics and macroeconomics.

    Cornell Engineering Dean Lance Collins said Jeremy’s enrollment is exciting and, given his surprising maturity, will be a good fit at the university.

    “While this is highly unusual, we feel that with the strong support of his parents – who will be moving here to provide him a place to live and study – and his unusual talents and thirst for knowledge, he will be able to thrive as an engineering student and take advantage of all that Cornell has to offer,” Collins said in an interview with Texas Tech University.

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    #232795 - 08/10/16 09:23 AM Re: Texas boy, 12, preps for life at Cornell [Re: Bostonian]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4228
    Wow! Interesting article.

    It was great that the article mentioned his maturity. In addition to academic/intellectual ability, this is so important:
    Originally Posted By: article
    given his surprising maturity, will be a good fit at the university.

    The article also mentions that the parents are moving from Texas to be close to Cornell, providing a place for their young son to live and study. Not every family could do that. This makes me curious as to their employment opportunities: When one thinks of aerospace and Texas, NASA comes to mind...


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    #232797 - 08/10/16 09:36 AM Re: Texas boy, 12, preps for life at Cornell [Re: Bostonian]
    aeh Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/26/14
    Posts: 3638
    More in this: http://today.ttu.edu/posts/2016/08/jeremy-shuler

    LM has a site near Cornell, and mom paused her career to homeschool him.


    Edited by aeh (08/10/16 09:37 AM)

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    #232973 - 08/18/16 03:23 PM Re: Texas boy, 12, preps for life at Cornell [Re: Bostonian]
    LoveSunnyDays Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 07/24/16
    Posts: 18
    Loc: West Coast
    I have a lot of admiration for his parents. They must've had to hear a lot of detractors accusing them of pushing their son for their personal glory. All of us with exceptionally gifted children know that these children can't be pushed, rather they push themselves so hard we often have to tell them to please slow down. It's really hard for people who are not exceptionally gifted or have such children to know what it's like to raise such children.

    As I've always said, if I had a choice, I would choose having a child who excels in sports over one who excels academically, my life would be sooo much easier! Ours is a society that looks at you with admiration if you have a child who goes to the Olympics or NBA, but a child heading for a top 10 school will get you nothing but jealousy induced scorn.

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    #232975 - 08/18/16 03:49 PM Re: Texas boy, 12, preps for life at Cornell [Re: LoveSunnyDays]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4228
    Originally Posted By: LoveSunnyDays
    All of us with exceptionally gifted children know that these children can't be pushed, rather they push themselves so hard we often have to tell them to please slow down. It's really hard for people who are not exceptionally gifted or have such children to know what it's like to raise such children.
    Agreed! smile
    That is to say, you've perfectly described the variety of giftedness which I am familiar with.

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    #232987 - 08/19/16 04:39 AM Re: Texas boy, 12, preps for life at Cornell [Re: Bostonian]
    75west Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/11/11
    Posts: 471
    Says an awful lot about Cornell too as well as the mother (who did the homeschooling and put her career on hold). Only a handful of schools are equipped to take kids at age 12.

    And yes these kids often push themselves...but often their parents...and often to the brink.

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