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    #213121 - 03/23/15 11:30 AM New here
    kjs Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 03/16/15
    Posts: 29
    Hi!
    I am the mom of an 8 year old boy. He is in second grade and has always seemed a bit ahead of his peers but this year he tested at 5th grade for math and 6th grade for reading. He's also interested in things that aren't really available for his age around here, like coding, programming and robotics. The programs we find online or on apps are too advanced, he gets frustrated and gives up.

    There is no gifted program in our district. We're from Massachusetts and I read how bad the options are for GAT kids and I am starting to see it for myself.

    I want to get him tested for giftedness but this costs $600-1500 dollars (depending on the type of test, I guess). I just called my insurance and they don't cover it. We have decent insurance so I was hoping they would, but I guess not.

    There is a private school in town that seems more geared towards his abilities and is very hands on and creative, but we applied and while he did get accepted, financial aid did not give us enough for it to be affordable for us at this time. I'm not currently working so I am planning on getting a job, saving up and possibly revisiting the idea next year.

    I guess I just don't know what to do next. He says he hates school and while I think he is exaggerating a bit, I know he is bored. The thing is, how do we know if he's always going to be so ahead of his grade or if he will eventually even out? Is there any place I can look into for reduced rate gifted testing or different payment options?

    I guess I'm wondering what you all think I should do next--much appreciated!

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    #213229 - 03/24/15 08:30 PM Re: New here [Re: kjs]
    CCN Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/25/12
    Posts: 978
    Loc: BC, Canada
    If you just want to get an idea of his IQ you could see if there's a MENSA chapter near you that will test him. MENSA testing doesn't give you as much detail but they can estimate his IQ for you, and because it's proctored it would carry some weight (as opposed to something on-line).

    (I think an IQ would help to determine if he's just developmentally ahead temporarily or if he's actually gifted)

    When I did the testing it was about $60 (this was a few years ago though). It took about 2 hours and 2 tests where given (one was the Stanford Binet and I can't recall the name of the other one). I'm not sure how it would work with children, but since MENSA accepts child members I'm assuming they'd provide testing, although I'm not sure which tests they'd use.

    Regardless, though, what matters is his engagement... whether he's gifted or not. Can you enrich him after school? Give him material that interests and challenges him?

    Best of luck - I hope you find a solution for your son.



    Edited by CCN (03/24/15 08:33 PM)

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    #213233 - 03/24/15 10:28 PM Re: New here [Re: kjs]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4474
    Welcome!
    Originally Posted By: kjs
    He is in second grade and has always seemed a bit ahead of his peers but this year he tested at 5th grade for math and 6th grade for reading.
    What type of test was this? For example, was this a school-administered online adaptive test like MAP test (Measures of Academic Progress)?

    Quote:
    He's also interested in things that aren't really available for his age around here, like coding, programming and robotics. The programs we find online or on apps are too advanced, he gets frustrated and gives up.
    There are some good online programs, and asking for recommendations may be a good question to post on the forum. Frustration is something to work on, it may be related to perfectionism.

    Quote:
    There is no gifted program in our district. We're from Massachusetts and I read how bad the options are for GAT kids and I am starting to see it for myself.
    You may wish to read up on advocacy and speak to the school about placing your son at the appropriate level of curriculum for math and for reading. If you might consider a grade skip, you may wish to become familiar with the Iowa Acceleration Scale (IAS).

    Quote:
    I want to get him tested for giftedness but this costs $600-1500 dollars (depending on the type of test, I guess). I just called my insurance and they don't cover it. We have decent insurance so I was hoping they would, but I guess not.
    Insurance typically covers IQ tests only if there is a possible diagnosis of learning disability.

    Quote:
    I guess I just don't know what to do next. He says he hates school and while I think he is exaggerating a bit, I know he is bored.
    Since you mentioned that you are not currently working, might you consider homeschooling? Lots of good information at Gifted Homeschoolers Forum (GHF)

    Quote:
    The thing is, how do we know if he's always going to be so ahead of his grade or if he will eventually even out?
    It is not possible to forecast this, as a child's learning is dependent upon many factors including IQ and opportunity, invoking the old nature/nurture debate.

    Quote:
    Is there any place I can look into for reduced rate gifted testing or different payment options?
    Some families have had their child tested by the Psychology department of their local university. However many parents believe it is worth the extra cost to have their children tested by someone familiar with gifted. Hoagies' list provides a good starting point.

    Quote:
    I guess I'm wondering what you all think I should do next--much appreciated!
    Read the info at all links, scour old posts on the forum, and consider homeschooling. smile

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    #213234 - 03/24/15 10:33 PM Re: New here [Re: CCN]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4474
    Originally Posted By: CCN
    MENSA testing doesn't give you as much detail but they can estimate his IQ for you
    Mensa's proctored admission tests are intended for Mensa admission only, and are administered to persons age 14 and up, who've not previously taken those particular IQ tests.

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    #213235 - 03/24/15 11:50 PM Re: New here [Re: indigo]
    CCN Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/25/12
    Posts: 978
    Loc: BC, Canada
    Originally Posted By: indigo
    Originally Posted By: CCN
    MENSA testing doesn't give you as much detail but they can estimate his IQ for you
    Mensa's proctored admission tests are intended for Mensa admission only, and are administered to persons age 14 and up, who've not previously taken those particular IQ tests.


    Right... but you don't have to join. Even if you did you could leave after a year. Also your eligibility stays on file for life, which is kind of nice. You can let your membership lapse and not pay dues for years, and then simply rejoin without having to be retested (there isn't much benefit to membership, really... other than the monthly magazine... unless it's changed. I never attended any of the social stuff. I'm currently not a member).

    I didn't realize, though, that they don't test anyone under 14. My bad... sorry. (I was an adult when tested so that info wasn't relevant).


    Edited by CCN (03/24/15 11:50 PM)

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    #213236 - 03/24/15 11:55 PM Re: New here [Re: indigo]
    CCN Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/25/12
    Posts: 978
    Loc: BC, Canada
    Originally Posted By: indigo

    Quote:
    I guess I just don't know what to do next. He says he hates school and while I think he is exaggerating a bit, I know he is bored.
    Since you mentioned that you are not currently working, might you consider homeschooling? Lots of good information at Gifted Homeschoolers Forum (GHF)



    Yes smile This could be a good option. This way you can tailor his education to his individual needs. I'd give it serious thought.

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    #213238 - 03/25/15 03:56 AM Re: New here [Re: CCN]
    puffin Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/11/12
    Posts: 2035
    You need to know the kind of test for maths - was it a fifth grade test or did he test at fifth grade level. The first means he can do fifth grade work the second means he can do the second grade maths as well as the average fifth grader. Still impressive but not requiring a 3 year jump.

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    #213240 - 03/25/15 05:09 AM Re: New here [Re: kjs]
    madeinuk Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/18/13
    Posts: 1453
    Loc: NJ
    Welcome.

    Google Singapore Maths - the books presentthe material in an orderly manner and are far from taxing but they do ensure that the kids proceed in a decently rigorous way.

    My DD just tore through arithmetic at a frightening pace - I used the books to reassure myself that she wasn't going too fast and leaving any gaps.

    AoPS books, Alcumus and online classes can provide further opportunities.

    Reading is something that you have FULL control of just give your child different books and totally ignore any objections from any teacher (this is what I did). Obviously you need to monitor to ensure that her child has a good grasp of the material that they are reading but a few conversations should tell you that along the way.

    For coding and robotics/electronics, there are plenty of books,online resources like 'hour of code' and even online classes like AoPS if you want to make that investment. Google 'maker faire' or makezine for cool hands on projects.

    Good luck!

    I would give testing a serious try too as I would want to reassure myself that I wasn't setting my child up for failure before trying to place in an uber academic school or program.

    BTW -I am far from being the Man with the Plan - just another anxious parent doing my best to fumble my way through the fog but the above has worked well for my DD10 so far...


    Edited by madeinuk (03/25/15 05:14 AM)
    _________________________
    Become what you are

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    #213241 - 03/25/15 05:32 AM Re: New here [Re: CCN]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4474
    Originally Posted By: CCN
    don't have to join.
    Interesting point! smile
    Quote:
    I didn't realize, though, that they don't test anyone under 14.
    The age is determined by the norms for scoring.
    Quote:
    My bad... sorry.
    It's good you mentioned the tests as a possibility... some readers may wish to take the Mensa admissions test... also you having thought of this and shared it opened the door for adding more detailed information and a link. If everyone worried about the completeness of the information they shared, there'd be nothing to share and no one would benefit.

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    #213242 - 03/25/15 05:50 AM Re: New here [Re: kjs]
    kjs Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 03/16/15
    Posts: 29
    Wow, thanks for all the information!
    I don't know the name of the math test, but yes, it was a school-administered test that they gave all the kids.

    I can find things for him to do online but my main concern is him being bored at school (I did read the thread about using the word bored after I wrote my post!) I don't want him to lose that motivation and ability simply due to lack of stimulation. He is worried that he if he learns more after school, he'll be even more bored at school.

    I'm not sure I'm cut out for homeschooling. I'm not very patient and I don't think I'm good at explaining things. He already wants to know things I don't understand, LOL. Plus I really do need to get a job.

    I do let him read at his own pace, making sure the subject material isn't too mature for him. He has read all the Harry Potters 3 times, and is reading Percy Jackson now. The teacher doesn't seem to have any complaints when he brings stuff like that to school. I think she understands his needs but there is only so much she can do.

    I was reading some of your posts yesterday and I really saw a lot of my son in the things people said about their kids. Thanks again smile

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