Gifted Bulletin Board

Welcome to the Gifted Issues Discussion Forum.

We invite you to share your experiences and to post information about advocacy, research and other gifted education issues on this free public discussion forum.
CLICK HERE to Log In. Click here for the Board Rules.

Links
DITD Logo

Learn about the Davidson Academy’s online campus for profoundly gifted students living anywhere in the U.S.

The Davidson Institute for Talent Development is a national nonprofit dedicated to supporting profoundly gifted students through the following programs:

  • Davidson Fellows Scholarship
  • Davidson Young Scholars
  • Davidson Academy
  • THINK Summer Institute
  • DITD FaceBook   DITD Twitter   DITD YouTube
    The Davidson Institute is on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube!

    How gifted-friendly is
    your state?

    Subscribe to the Davidson Institute's eNews-Update

    Who's Online
    0 registered (), 0 Guests and 171 Spiders online.
    Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
    Newest Members
    Jenny04, JamesD, SandyC8, Fer, Dilan294335
    10865 Registered Users
    November
    Su M Tu W Th F Sa
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7
    8 9 10 11 12 13 14
    15 16 17 18 19 20 21
    22 23 24 25 26 27 28
    29 30
    Topic Options
    #200206 - 09/07/14 05:08 AM Big History Project
    Bostonian Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/14/10
    Posts: 2597
    Loc: MA
    Seeing the article

    So Bill Gates Has This Idea for a History Class
    By ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
    New York Times
    September 5, 2014

    Quote:
    In 2011, the Big History Project debuted in five high schools, but in the three years since, Gates and Christian — along with a team of educational consultants, executives and teachers, mostly based in Seattle — have quietly accelerated its growth. This fall, the project will be offered free to more than 15,000 students in some 1,200 schools, from the Brooklyn School for Collaborative Studies in New York to Greenhills School in Ann Arbor, Mich., to Gates’s alma mater, Lakeside Upper School in Seattle. And if all goes well, the Big History Project will be introduced in hundreds of more classrooms by next year and hundreds, if not thousands, more the year after that, scaling along toward the vision Gates first experienced on that treadmill. Last month, the University of California system announced that a version of the Big History Project course could be counted in place of a more traditional World History class, paving the way for the state’s 1,300 high schools to offer it.

    on the Big History Project I recommended it to my 11yo son, who is in 7th grade. He has been watching some of the videos and likes it. I do wonder if a video-based course is better than one based on a textbook and written primary sources. At least if there is a textbook, parents can skim it to quickly get an idea of what is covered in the course.

    Top
    #200207 - 09/07/14 05:15 AM Re: Big History Project [Re: Bostonian]
    madeinuk Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/18/13
    Posts: 1450
    Loc: NJ
    Looks great - I will to introduce this to my DD when she takes her head out of her Marvel Encylopedia and gets breakfast LOL
    _________________________
    Become what you are

    Top
    #200218 - 09/07/14 08:47 AM Re: Big History Project [Re: Bostonian]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4300
    Thank you for sharing the Big History Project (BHP). After a quick perusal of the BHP website, a few thoughts:

    1) The BHP website "Credits" page lists Further Reading for Chapters 1-5. I find 16 books listed, the majority of these from the past decade. The most recent book listed was published in 2013. The oldest publication date listed is 1988.

    For its public face and presentation page, some may find it odd that a "big picture" summary of so many years of history does not offer an extensive bibliography and chooses to limit recommendations for further reading to:
    - few resources
    - exclusively titles which are recent.

    2) Quote from BHP website: "... the Big History story has developed over time, and will continue to evolve."

    - This notice provides a heads up or fair warning that content may be in a state of flux. When trust is given based on outward appearance while contents may be unknown, this may bring to mind thoughts of blank checks or of the Trojan horse.

    - Once accepted as a mainstream education tool, in what ways might BHP evolve? Will changes to BHP be documented and made known? Or might changes be made without transparency?

    - Will this be a one-size-fits-all nationalized curriculum? What vast stores of knowledge would be left on the shelf if all schools taught the same narrow selection from the many past centuries of accumulated knowledge? A statement on the BHP website, seeking early adopters to "create a movement" suggests that BHP developers "can customize the course, aligning it with PBL, STEM, and other unique environments." Ongoing, will changes be offered as options, respecting local control of schools?

    3) The home page of the BHP website describes the Big History Project as a "Common Core-aligned course". With CCSS currently consisting only of standards for English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics, does this imply alignment to ELA? Additional mention of CCSS is at a high level and does not provide information: "Built to hit Common Core, C3 and state standards — built from the ground up to align with the expectations of the CCSS, starting with the learning outcomes and including the assessment and lesson activities."

    4) In "preparing it for free public access", will BHP online software track and collect data on users?

    Originally Posted By: Bostonian
    At least if there is a textbook, parents can skim it to quickly get an idea of what is covered in the course.
    Agreed. A textbook version may be less portable, yet books offer advantages such as:
    - stability of content,
    - transparent publication history (version/edition, copyright date, ISBN, authorship),
    - no data tracking of readers,
    - access:
    - - any number of persons may use/read/share a book,
    - - a book may be used/read for an indefinite length of time without additional costs imposed,
    - - a book has no scheduled outage or downtime,
    - - a book has no unplanned outage or downtime,
    - - a reader can access book pages in any order,
    - - - parents can access book pages:
    - - - can thumb through to see what is being taught/learned,
    - - - can flip pages to observe context and tone of the information provided,
    - - - can ascertain gaps/omissions/censorship... what is NOT being taught.


    A highly summarized "big history" may be valuable as a map or travel guide for identifying where a person may wish to spend their time, but cannot replace visiting the source. To the degree that "the Big History Project emphasizes inquiry, analysis, and argument over content knowledge", some may say students ought to be encouraged to compare/contrast BHP material with source documents in context. This may include learning to read cursive, and understanding Roman Numerals.

    Top
    #200237 - 09/07/14 01:14 PM Re: Big History Project [Re: indigo]
    Bostonian Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/14/10
    Posts: 2597
    Loc: MA
    Thanks for mentioning the credits page.

    I see that David Christian has co-authored

    Big History: Between Nothing and Everything (2013)
    by David Christian, Cynthia Brown, and Craig Benjamin

    which is 352 pages and costs about $70 on Amazon.

    Since

    Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History (2011)
    by David Christian

    is 672 pages and costs only about $20, I may get this book instead.

    Top
    #235930 - 01/16/17 07:37 AM Re: Big History Project [Re: Bostonian]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4300
    Here is another online resource which may be of interest when studying history:

    An Outline of American History, published by United States Information Agency, 1994... including:
    - An Outline of American History, Table of Contents
    - Outline of American History, Chapter 14: Brief Reading List in American History, which lists over 100 titles, with publication dates spanning half a century (ranging from 1940s to 1990s).

    PDF version here, dated 2005.

    Top
    #235931 - 01/16/17 10:24 AM Re: Big History Project [Re: Bostonian]
    madeinuk Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/18/13
    Posts: 1450
    Loc: NJ
    This looks great - thanks for sharing.

    I liked this part of the article too (Bill Gates recalling his schooldays):

    Quote:
    Without prompting, he recounted getting a bad grade in an eighth-grade geography course (“They paired me up with a moron, and I realized these people thought I was stupid, and it really [SPAM] me off!”)


    I am sure that plenty of our kids here could relate!
    _________________________
    Become what you are

    Top
    #235936 - 01/17/17 08:15 AM Re: Big History Project [Re: madeinuk]
    greenlotus Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/17/14
    Posts: 574
    Originally Posted By: madeinuk
    This looks great - thanks for sharing.

    I liked this part of the article too (Bill Gates recalling his schooldays):

    Quote:
    Without prompting, he recounted getting a bad grade in an eighth-grade geography course (“They paired me up with a moron, and I realized these people thought I was stupid, and it really [SPAM] me off!”)


    I am sure that plenty of our kids here could relate!


    This is DD's least favorite part of school - group projects. She is absolutely baffled and irritated by other the other kids who do the work just because they have to! I'm sure they aren't pleased with her either!

    Top
    #235937 - 01/17/17 08:16 AM Re: Big History Project [Re: Bostonian]
    greenlotus Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/17/14
    Posts: 574
    Oops - forgot to say thanks for letting us know about the class!!

    Top
    #236763 - 02/24/17 05:16 PM Re: Big History Project [Re: Bostonian]
    abv Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 02/24/17
    Posts: 6
    These are great resources - thank you! Not an online resource, but my ds7-8 couldn't put down the Joy Hakim series on American History and History of Science.

    Top


    Moderator:  M-Moderator 
    Recent Posts
    Children need free time to find their passions
    by Wren
    Today at 04:55 AM
    Queen's Gambit, chess, and gifted children
    by Eagle Mum
    Yesterday at 09:34 PM
    Help With Interpretation of DAS ii scores
    by aeh
    Yesterday at 04:25 PM
    A Progressive Assault on Selective High Schools
    by Wren
    Yesterday at 12:50 PM
    Long time lurker... just got back my WAIS-IV score
    by Eagle Mum
    11/28/20 01:55 PM
    Davidson Institute Twitter