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    #198202 - 08/09/14 11:37 AM Article - MIT at age 14, now changing the world
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4224
    He went to MIT at the age of 14, and now he's changing the world
    By Dr. Boyce Watkins
    The Black Homeschool
    July 22, 2014

    Quote:
    Halfway through the sixth grade, the work was just too easy. So, Davidís mother petitioned to have him sent directly to high school. When the school said no, she simply did what any good parent would do: Worked around the system.
    and
    Quote:
    1) The in-home culture created by a childís parents is one of the most definitive factors in determining that childís outcomes...
    2) Intellect means almost nothing without persistence and development...
    3) Had Davidís parents not had the courage to think outside the box, their sons would have merely been smart kids doing relatively good things, and not brilliant kids doing unbelievable things...


    Kudos to these students, their parents, and to the author for making their story known and inspiring others. Dr. Boyce Watkins is also author of an e-book, Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About College

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    #198206 - 08/09/14 02:16 PM Re: Article - MIT at age 14, now changing the world [Re: indigo]
    KJP Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/29/12
    Posts: 756
    I like hearing these stories but I get put off by the "and your kid can do this too if they try hard enough and you parent the right way" vibe.

    I am just skeptical of the "intellect means almost nothing" part. Later in that paragraph it says "his intellect will help him a little".

    I think a more realistic approach would be to say a kid that can do this at that age is intellectually probably one in ten thousand of same aged kids. Then among that small group, still fewer will have the executive function skills and maturity for actually doing advanced coursework at an elite university at 13. Then of that already very very small group, the kid would need to grow up in a supportive environment AND have the work ethic to actually make this happen.

    I think it just irks me that we speak of natural athletes who become great athletes with hard work but to speak of the intellectual equivalent is taboo.

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    #198208 - 08/09/14 03:12 PM Re: Article - MIT at age 14, now changing the world [Re: KJP]
    Space_Cadet Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 10/30/13
    Posts: 42
    Originally Posted By: KJP
    I like hearing these stories but I get put off by the "and your kid can do this too if they try hard enough and you parent the right way" vibe.

    I am just skeptical of the "intellect means almost nothing" part. Later in that paragraph it says "his intellect will help him a little".

    I think a more realistic approach would be to say a kid that can do this at that age is intellectually probably one in ten thousand of same aged kids. Then among that small group, still fewer will have the executive function skills and maturity for actually doing advanced coursework at an elite university at 13. Then of that already very very small group, the kid would need to grow up in a supportive environment AND have the work ethic to actually make this happen.

    I think it just irks me that we speak of natural athletes who become great athletes with hard work but to speak of the intellectual equivalent is taboo.







    I didn't get that vibe. It seemed to me that the intended audience was parents of very bright children (the type of children that might be extremely bored in 6th grade.) Those parents may be familiar with paths to modest success, but not excellence. Thus, the explanation that it takes more than intellect to achieve great things.

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    #198209 - 08/09/14 03:38 PM Re: Article - MIT at age 14, now changing the world [Re: Space_Cadet]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4224
    Originally Posted By: Space_Cadet
    Originally Posted By: KJP
    I am just skeptical of the "intellect means almost nothing" part...

    I didn't get that vibe. It seemed to me that the intended audience was parents of very bright children (the type of children that might be extremely bored in 6th grade.) Those parents may be familiar with paths to modest success, but not excellence. Thus, the explanation that it takes more than intellect to achieve great things.
    Well said. I understood it this way, too. Great care was taken by the author to introduce the audience to the circumstances early in the article.

    There may be danger in taking a few words out of context such as Intellect means almost nothing without persistence and development. However I do understand that the lived experiences of some readers may cause the first phrase of that sentence to elicit such a strong response, or hit in such a vulnerable spot, that the rest of the sentence does not register fully.

    There may be a beneficial partnership of nature/nurture, and of intellect/practice.

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    #198224 - 08/09/14 09:05 PM Re: Article - MIT at age 14, now changing the world [Re: indigo]
    Nautigal Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/22/09
    Posts: 1032
    It makes perfect sense to me, as a parent of a child who has the intellect to do something like that but doesn't have the motivation to get out of bed without a bucket of ice being poured over his head, that intellect means almost nothing without persistence and development.

    It's necessary to HAVE the intellect, but having it isn't enough unless you do something with it as well.

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    #198235 - 08/10/14 08:51 AM Re: Article - MIT at age 14, now changing the world [Re: indigo]
    jack'smom Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/02/10
    Posts: 757
    It looks like it took him 10 years to get an MD-PhD at UCLA, 4 years MD and 6 years PhD, which is average in time. His father has a degree from MIT and his mother has a degree from Caltech, so quite a bright family!

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    #198255 - 08/10/14 04:57 PM Re: Article - MIT at age 14, now changing the world [Re: indigo]
    75west Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/11/11
    Posts: 471
    Thanks so much for posting the article. I really appreciate. Intellect is part of the equation, but motivation and drive is another part of the equation too. The parents instilled some wonderful values here and they should be seen as role models. I applaud them.

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