Gifted Bulletin Board

Welcome to the Gifted Issues Discussion Forum.

We invite you to share your experiences and to post information about advocacy, research and other gifted education issues on this free public discussion forum.
CLICK HERE to Log In. Click here for the Board Rules.

Links
DITD Logo

Learn about the Davidson Academy’s online campus for profoundly gifted students living anywhere in the U.S.

The Davidson Institute for Talent Development is a national nonprofit dedicated to supporting profoundly gifted students through the following programs:

  • Davidson Fellows Scholarship
  • Davidson Young Scholars
  • Davidson Academy
  • THINK Summer Institute
  • DITD FaceBook   DITD Twitter   DITD YouTube
    The Davidson Institute is on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube!

    How gifted-friendly is
    your state?

    Subscribe to the Davidson Institute's eNews-Update

    Who's Online
    1 registered (jolip), 0 Guests and 88 Spiders online.
    Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
    Newest Members
    Anujjindal, GuppyPix, Anand, RGJack, slmw
    10769 Registered Users
    July
    Su M Tu W Th F Sa
    1 2 3 4
    5 6 7 8 9 10 11
    12 13 14 15 16 17 18
    19 20 21 22 23 24 25
    26 27 28 29 30 31
    Topic Options
    #191051 - 05/13/14 02:00 PM Common Core and Gifted Education
    Mark D. Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/31/69
    Posts: 271
    What kind of impact will the Common Core have on gifted education? The latest Davidson Educators Guild Newsletter includes an interview with Tamra Stambaugh, Ph.D. of Programs for Talented Youth at Vanderbilt University. She discusses how the Common Core will affect gifted students, provides educators tips on how to implement the common core with gifted students, and more. A number of related resources are also provided. http://news.ditd.org/EdGuild/Newsletter/EG_Newsletter_Spring_2014_web.htm

    Top
    #191070 - 05/13/14 05:46 PM Re: Common Core and Gifted Education [Re: Mark D.]
    Sweetie Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/05/11
    Posts: 669
    All I know is that I won't let it impact my son negatively. If his needs aren't met, we have plans to withdraw to homeschool. So we take it year by year, but he won't suffer or let anyone or anything hold him back or not meet his educational needs because "they" feel the CC is rigorous enough.
    _________________________
    ...reading is pleasure, not just something teachers make you do in school.~B. Cleary

    Top
    #191073 - 05/13/14 06:02 PM Re: Common Core and Gifted Education [Re: Mark D.]
    Loy58 Offline
    Member

    Registered: 09/11/13
    Posts: 816
    Thank you for the interview - nice to read.

    I am very concerned about how the Common Core is being implemented in our area. So far, a G&T teacher has been pulled away from her duties to instead help struggling students meet the new standards (leaving the G&T students without a G&T teacher), and advanced math classes might be cut (because they are now "unnecessary" due to the Common Core standards). The standards seem to have our schools in a tizzy, but the G&T students still need to be challenged.

    Top
    #191081 - 05/13/14 08:20 PM Re: Common Core and Gifted Education [Re: Mark D.]
    indigo Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/27/13
    Posts: 4221
    Differentiated task demands were described in the posted link and the linked full article.
    This is NOT differentiated instruction, placement, and pacing.

    For example, pages 3, 4, 5 of the 11-page PowerPoint PDF (archive here) "Gifted Students and the Common Core: Implications for Practice" show differentiated task demands. These consist of lengthier, more time-consuming assignments and/or homework given to gifted students. These may be seen as punitive and are conditions which many parents of gifted kiddos have routinely objected to and advocated against.

    In some cases the additional "task demands" also present constraints on creativity by providing more specific direction.


    The slide labeled The Power of "THAT" and "AND" offers the following CC outcomes, differentiated for gifted learners:
    Create a new ending to the story
    -VS-
    Create a new ending to the story THAT incorporates the theme of beauty AND includes symbolism.

    Create a new math problem to teach a friend
    -VS-
    Create a problem THAT illustrates the differences between the distributive and associative property AND show your work.

    Create your ideal playground and defend your creation
    -VS-
    Create a playground THAT is to scale, illustrates at least three simple machines, AND uses recyclable materials.
    Unfortunately, this is NOT what parents of gifted children have believed was lacking in their children's education. This higher level of demands for output is NOT what most parents have sought and advocated for. Instead, this may be a step in the wrong direction. Why are schools interested in providing this? Possibly to help them reach their goals of closing achievement gaps, closing excellence gaps, and recording grades which indicate equal outcomes among all pupils; these goals necessitate capping the growth of students at the top.

    Impacts on Gifted Students
    - Differentiated "task demands" take time from a gifted student's other preferred extracurricular pursuits, and may thereby isolate and demoralize gifted learners.

    - An intended or unintended consequence of this negative educational experience is that the gifted and/or high-achieving kids may begin to intentionally underperform and underachieve in order to avoid the punitive homework demands placed on the gifted and/or high-achieving. This underperformance of the the gifted (and formerly high-achieving) pupils helps a school close gaps and achieve equal outcomes. The Sept 2011 report summarizing research by NWEA - Fordham comes to mind. Titled "Do High Flyers Maintain Their Altitude?" the report indicates that some students may become "descenders" within a given one-third of their class. This information may have inspired some schools to intentionally create "descenders" as the school strives to close gaps and achieve equal outcomes.

    Impacts on Grades
    - Differentiated "task demands" make it more difficult and time-consuming for these gifted students to earn the same grade as their classmates.

    - Differentiated "task demands" can be a means of knocking down the grades of top students, to help create the illusion of "equal outcomes" in the classroom, closing achievement gaps, closing excellence gaps, etc.

    - Student grades are stored in a permanent longitudinal database.

    - When grades are viewed (including by researchers, college admissions, etc), people tend to believe that the grades are reflective of the student body's work on the same assigned task; This is a false premise when there are "differentiated task demands".

    Impacts on Teachers and Schools
    - Differentiated "task demands" may help close "achievement gaps" and/or "excellence gaps". Or more accurately, may give the appearance of closing gaps in knowledge among students, by closing the gaps in the assigned grades.
    - Teachers and schools are increasing rated/ranked based on closing gaps and achieving equal outcomes among students.
    - Therefore using "differentiated task demands" may represent a "win" for teachers and schools.


    Here is a link to an excellent post about findings of research regarding homework (hat tip to aeh), which may help shine a light on likely outcomes of "differentiated task demands".


    NOTE: The WayBack Machine (internet archive) is often useful when a website or webpage is NOT FOUND or has been changed and no longer contains the described content.

    Top


    Moderator:  M-Moderator 
    Recent Posts
    Taking a Gap Year or Dropping Out?
    by Anisotropic
    Today at 09:38 PM
    one proposed instructional response to covid
    by aeh
    07/05/20 06:21 PM
    Middle school math
    by Eagle Mum
    07/05/20 04:56 PM
    Juneteenth - Independence Day
    by indigo
    07/04/20 07:22 PM
    Happy 4th of July (USA Independence Day) 2020
    by indigo
    07/04/20 04:35 PM
    Davidson Institute Twitter