Gifted Bulletin Board

Welcome to the Gifted Issues Discussion Forum.

We invite you to share your experiences and to post information about advocacy, research and other gifted education issues on this free public discussion forum.
CLICK HERE to Log In. Click here for the Board Rules.

Links


Learn about the Davidson Academy’s online campus for profoundly gifted students living anywhere in the U.S.

The Davidson Institute is a national nonprofit dedicated to supporting profoundly gifted students through the following programs:

  • Fellows Scholarship
  • Young Scholars
  • Davidson Academy
  • THINK Summer Institute
  • DITD FaceBook   DITD Twitter   DITD YouTube
    The Davidson Institute is on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube!

    How gifted-friendly is
    your state?

    Subscribe to the Davidson Institute's eNews-Update

    Who's Online
    1 registered (1 invisible), 0 Guests and 75 Spiders online.
    Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
    Newest Members
    TEACHERMOM3.14, Drusillain, chinnny, Fast Words, LC001
    11242 Registered Users
    December
    Su M Tu W Th F Sa
    1 2 3
    4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    11 12 13 14 15 16 17
    18 19 20 21 22 23 24
    25 26 27 28 29 30 31
    Page 11 of 35 < 1 2 ... 9 10 11 12 13 ... 34 35 >
    Topic Options
    #170885 - 10/10/13 10:24 AM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: ashley]
    st pauli girl Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/29/08
    Posts: 1917
    Originally Posted By: ashley
    Does applying and getting accepted to DYS help in any way for a student who is not part of the public school system (hence no need for advocacy)? I am asking because I would like to search for a tester and apply for my DS who is 6. But, I am unable to push myself to do it because so far I have not come up with a good reason to do it (and spend money on the testing) in our case. I am also left with the feeling that I am a slacker mom for not having done it yet. Suppose a kid goes to private school that more or less meets his intellectual needs and he gets afterschool enrichment where those needs are not met, does getting accepted to DYS help in any way? Thanks in advance for your input!


    For my family, the biggest benefits to DS's DYS status are the connections we have made and the information we get from them. If money is an issue, and you can't find low-cost testing through a university or elsewhere, I'm not sure that I would go through the testing. Another benefit are various gatherings where you can meet other families like yours.

    Also, you could avoid the cost of testing if you were able to submit qualifying achievement scores plus a portfolio.

    Top
    #170886 - 10/10/13 10:29 AM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: ashley]
    ElizabethN Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/17/12
    Posts: 1390
    Loc: Seattle area
    Originally Posted By: ashley
    Does applying and getting accepted to DYS help in any way for a student who is not part of the public school system (hence no need for advocacy)? I am asking because I would like to search for a tester and apply for my DS who is 6. But, I am unable to push myself to do it because so far I have not come up with a good reason to do it (and spend money on the testing) in our case. I am also left with the feeling that I am a slacker mom for not having done it yet. Suppose a kid goes to private school that more or less meets his intellectual needs and he gets afterschool enrichment where those needs are not met, does getting accepted to DYS help in any way? Thanks in advance for your input!


    Can you afford a long weekend in Reno once a year? So far, the annual Summit has been the most valuable thing we have gotten out of DITD, with local gatherings being second mostly because they aren't frequent enough to bump them into first. We did get good advice on advocacy from them, but I think just being able to be with "our people" has been the biggest advantage.

    Top
    #170897 - 10/10/13 11:44 AM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: master of none]
    polarbear Offline
    Member

    Registered: 09/29/11
    Posts: 3363
    Originally Posted By: master of none

    This list is not to encourage or discourage testing. When my dd was 6, I felt the same way. Testing will not make a difference in her education so why do it. It wasn't til she was 8. We had her 2E brother tested and were surprised by how much information we had. Hemmed and hawed,and finally got dd tested. It more put a stamp on what we knew rather than offering lots of info, but was worth it's price when it came to advocacy.


    I just wanted to second mon's experience with testing. We had never considered testing for our children outside of what was required to get into our school district's gifted programs, then we ran head-on into a 2e wall for my ds in 2nd grade, and once we'd had that full suite of testing (with a tester who explained how the tests inter-related etc), it was such an amazing wealth of info for me as a parent. Whether or not it yields scores at DYS levels, it reveals a lot of info re how your child learns, where relative strengths and weaknesses are etc. It's also been a crucial piece of data for us in advocating for gifted services and accelerated coursework at school.

    polarbear

    Top
    #170899 - 10/10/13 11:59 AM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: bbq797]
    ashley Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/26/12
    Posts: 639
    Thank you polarbear, MON, Elizabeth and st pauli girl. I should have been more clear in my earlier post - DS goes to a good private school which is very rigorous academically for 1st grade and he gets pull outs to attend LA, Math and Computer programming with 2nd grade. We opted against grade skipping for now. The school is open to discussion on DS's needs and they also have opportunities like science fair, math contests, essay and spelling contests etc where DS can participate inhouse, I think (we are new to this school).
    I have an old WPPSI score for DS with FSIQ in the 140s from 2 years ago. It is not a detailed report. We afterschool DS in math and science and he attends enrichment classes and clubs outside of school too.
    Money is not the main issue in not getting DS tested - justifying to myself the pricetag of $3500-$4000 for it when there is no pressing need is the issue (these are typical Silicon Valley prices for testing). I plan to call Stanford university which is local to us and see if their testing is any lower in cost.
    We don't live too far from the Tahoe/Reno area, so stopping by at Reno once a year for a summit is not a problem.
    We have not even thought of college plans yet. But I can see how DYS connections can help in that area. And we already accelerate DS afterschool to meet his needs - detailed testing might give us a better idea on how to handle the acceleration.
    And I am sure that my son will enjoy spending time with "his kind of people". So, yeah, I will start being an un-slacker about this.
    Thanks for your help!

    Top
    #170901 - 10/10/13 12:04 PM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: bbq797]
    polarbear Offline
    Member

    Registered: 09/29/11
    Posts: 3363
    Ashley, I'm actually a bit of a slacker-personality myself smile Honestly, from what you've posted in your reply I'm not sure I'd be in a hurry to test or to apply for DYS - it sounds like things are going really well for your ds smile The time when test data has been most helpful for us was when our children *weren't* getting appropriately challenged at school and the school was putting up barriers. In your situation, I'd seriously consider waiting a few years to test - because your ds is still 6 (I think? - my apologies if I got that wrong!)... anyway, the reason I'd consider waiting is that there may be a perception that test scores are more reliable at 7-8 years old. Whether or not *you* believe that, we've found in advocating that other people will question early test scores.

    Best wishes,

    polarbear

    Top
    #170902 - 10/10/13 12:11 PM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: bbq797]
    ashley Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/26/12
    Posts: 639
    Thanks for your reply polarbear. We spent a bad year for DS in public K where we encountered poor "customer service" to put it mildly and recently moved him to a private school for 1st grade (yes, he is 6 years old). So far, we have had no complaints but we are only 6 weeks into it. We will see.
    I too believe that 7-8 years might be a better age for testing - largely because the child might be more mature and more in control of their impulses.
    I will also try to find the local DYS groups and see what kind of summits, meetings and events they have locally.

    Top
    #170903 - 10/10/13 12:11 PM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: ashley]
    madeinuk Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/18/13
    Posts: 1453
    Loc: NJ
    Originally Posted By: ashley
    Does applying and getting accepted to DYS help in any way for a student who is not part of the public school system (hence no need for advocacy)? I am asking because I would like to search for a tester and apply for my DS who is 6. But, I am unable to push myself to do it because so far I have not come up with a good reason to do it (and spend money on the testing) in our case. I am also left with the feeling that I am a slacker mom for not having done it yet. Suppose a kid goes to private school that more or less meets his intellectual needs and he gets afterschool enrichment where those needs are not met, does getting accepted to DYS help in any way? Thanks in advance for your input!


    We did it for the potential of finding intellectual peers for our DD more than anything else. I want her to know that there are other geeks and kids that look beyond the surface layers/think beyond the first move out there.


    Edited by madeinuk (10/10/13 12:15 PM)
    _________________________
    Become what you are

    Top
    #171017 - 10/11/13 02:32 PM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: bbq797]
    ashley Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/26/12
    Posts: 639
    Thank you, madeinuk. So far we have been finding intellectual peers for my DS in the friend circle as well as by attending enrichment clubs where there are kids at his level. So, when you say that you applied to DYS for the potential of finding intellectual peers, what do you mean by that? Do you get invitations to join a regional meet where all the DYS kids attend some activity together? Or do you initiate invitations to those kids to form groups for things like Destination Imagination and Science Fairs? Or do you just set up playdates for your child with these peers? Or do they all interact online?
    I am trying to understand exactly what everyone means by "finding intellectual peers" on this forum.

    Top
    #171018 - 10/11/13 03:00 PM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: bbq797]
    Zen Scanner Offline
    Member

    Registered: 07/13/12
    Posts: 1478
    Loc: NC
    At the most basic level "intellectual peer" would be in contrast to "age peer." It represents the complexity of language, ideas, interests over the coincidence of birthdays.

    Some gifted kids will fit in fine and adapt with their age peers doing many things. Others are really caught up in their world of ideas and the way they think about them, they may not be able to dial it back and will tend to gravitate to adults and much older kids.

    A six year old who says things like: "I am fascinated by the implications of mixing liquids of various PH levels; so, let us sneak into the back of the cafeteria and borrow some." might not get the most receptive of audiences on the playground to their ideas or conversation. So here, the asynchronous nature of gifted has a mix of a certain interest above age level and the common sense of a six year old. This kid might find an eight or nine year old who is interested in their idea, but could also be mocked for the bad plan.

    Not sure if that clarifies it enough, but that's the basic concept in my mind.


    Top
    #171021 - 10/11/13 03:38 PM Re: simple question about DYS application [Re: bbq797]
    ElizabethN Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/17/12
    Posts: 1390
    Loc: Seattle area
    There are regional meet-and-greet type events, if you are lucky enough to live close to an area with a great enough density of Young Scholars to attend one. Our next one is a couple hours gaming session at the library. If you meet someone that you "click" with through these, then presumably you could meet up for playdates with some of the connections you made there. The tools are there for online interaction between kids (the elists), but it doesn't seem to be really popular.

    Zen Scanner gives some good examples of why asynchronous kids may not fit in well with their age peers. As another example, DD8 wanted to "play goddesses" with her friends, and assign everyone roles as Greek goddesses, but everyone else did not necessarily have encyclopedic knowledge of them all, especially some of the lesser goddesses. Girls who were old enough to have read all the Percy Jackson books (her initial source of this knowledge) were not necessarily interested in pretend play any more. Peers who are both the same age and the same intellectual level were a better fit.

    Top
    Page 11 of 35 < 1 2 ... 9 10 11 12 13 ... 34 35 >


    Moderator:  M-Moderator 
    Recent Posts
    Out of level/early SAT
    by Vansh
    12/02/22 11:23 AM
    Aging
    by indigo
    12/01/22 01:33 PM
    WIAT-III outperforming WISC-V: 2e child
    by aeh
    11/30/22 08:17 PM
    The ultimate brag thread
    by Eagle Mum
    11/30/22 01:14 AM
    Q&A webinar for Davidson Young Scholars Program
    by indigo
    11/29/22 06:17 AM
    Davidson Institute Twitter