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    #139342 - 10/01/12 07:52 AM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: Astroboy]
    Evemomma Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/17/12
    Posts: 451
    I think belly issues are so common that they are bound to show up in any group. I imagine the large amount of processed foods and high sugar foods does not help the situation (and trust me, I wish I had the discpline to act more upon that fact than I do).

    That being said, I was a 'somaticizing' kid who felt every bellyache, splinter and mosquito bite with great intensity. I suspect that I was waaaaay too in tune with my body, and have had to learn to reassign a lot of those aches as within the realm of normal. My neice had the same issue and was labeled 'overdramatic'. Of course, I was also a kid of divorce with a lot of stress. Thus far, my kids don't seem to be nearly as sensitive as I was (and still am...the belly stuff continues, grrrr).

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    #143534 - 11/28/12 08:46 AM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: Astroboy]
    Freya Belle Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 01/05/12
    Posts: 4
    Loc: Spain
    i feel a little weird writing on this thread, as i'm the "gifted kid" in my family, not a parent, and I only came on here in a moment of curiosity and low spirits, but today I saw this... Although I agree with Evemomma (in my experience the number of kids with food issues is growing, and especially in countries with greater food processing)I'd like to mention that I have eating problams too. I don't know what the connection is, but I have an idea it's to do with nerves and the more intelectually active and hyped up you are (substitute gifted) the more likely you are to be highly strung and thus have problams eating.

    Anyway... it's certainly a nervous thing with me smile
    _________________________
    "If they give you lined paper,
    Write the other way"

    Jiménez

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    #143575 - 11/28/12 07:30 PM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: Astroboy]
    petunia Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/17/11
    Posts: 146
    How do you know what foods your kids can't tolerate? Maybe my son's behavior problems stem from a food issue. He couldn't tolerate dairy as a baby but has been able to tolerate ice cream and cheese as he's gotten older. He now doesn't like cow's milk - he drinks soy (which someone told me you're not supposed to give to boys because it inhibits brain growth:) ). He had multiple ear and sinus infections after we switched from breast to dairy formula, which cleared up immediately when we switched to soy formula (about 12 months old) when my mom thought to tell me "oh, two of your sisters couldn't tolerate dairy".

    Do you just have to start eliminating things from their diets? What do you look for to see if things are better/different? Might be worth a try for us. Seems like someone noted above the most common intolerances are soy, dairy, and gluten.
    _________________________
    What I am is good enough, if I would only be it openly. ~Carl Rogers

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    #143577 - 11/28/12 07:58 PM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: Astroboy]
    MumOfThree Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/11
    Posts: 1654
    Loc: Australia
    Petunia if you are going to look at food intolerances I really recommend doing it thoroughly, scientifically and with the support of a really experienced dietician. There are so many mistakes and pitfalls to make that will lead to false conclusions and you need to make sure you are doing it safely as well as thoroughly. In Australia I recommend the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Elimination Diet Handbook, their cook book and then a local dietician familiar with their approach. I am not sure what to suggest to you...

    For us we followed the handbook recommendations for how to go strictly low salicylate, low amine, no numbers (colours, flavours, preservatives), gluten and dairy free. Once you have been on this elimination stage diet and had two weeks of reduced symptoms you start adding things back in one at at time. If you saw no change on the diet and you are sure you got it right (it's very easy to miss hidden sources), then you can pretty much just go back to normal (but pay attention to see if that causes any issues). If you did see improvement from symptoms and you are going to challenge to see what caused the problem then there are really strict rules about how to do this as there are very few foods that have only one of the chemicals in that you might need to test (for example cheese has both dairy AND amines, many foods have both salicylats AND amines), you need to challenge in high enough doses and over enough days before concluding whether you can or can't re-introduce that food. This is why you need the experienced deitician.

    My husband had known dairy issues right from childhood, but was drinking milk, eating cheese and all other sources of dairy like it was going out of style when I made him join the rest of the family on the diet. He would have said he was ok with dairy now. Well after two weeks dairy free he was not and has never since been able to re-introduce dairy without making himself sick. His problem is not with Lactose it's with cow's milk protien. None of my children can tolerate it either, I can tolerate at least some. On the other hand he can eat as much Salicylate as he likes, as can my middle daughther, but my youngest, eldest and I cannot tolerate Salicylate, my youngest daughter's salicylate intolerance is quite extreme.

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    #143589 - 11/29/12 04:59 AM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: Astroboy]
    petunia Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/17/11
    Posts: 146
    Thanks. His problem behaviors only occur at home, though. Is it possible for him to compensate for these things in other environments? It seems if it were a food sensitivity, he'd have behavior issues across the board. If you've read some of my other posts, you know I'm totally grasping at straws here.
    _________________________
    What I am is good enough, if I would only be it openly. ~Carl Rogers

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    #143594 - 11/29/12 06:59 AM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: petunia]
    Dude Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/04/11
    Posts: 2856
    Originally Posted By: petunia
    How do you know what foods your kids can't tolerate?


    In our case, it couldn't have been easier to diagnose DD with lactose intolerance (but certainly wasn't easy to experience). DW had a health issue early on that forced a switch to formula for DD. Immediately after switching, we observed that her stomach was bloated and hard, and she had stopped defecating.

    We switched her out to one of those formulas that are advertised as easy to digest (lactose free and every protein broken down to smaller chains), and the problem was relieved. Those formulas are rather expensive, though, so later on we tried one that was just lactose free, and that worked out fine.

    Of course, we already knew DW was lactose intolerant, so that helped.

    Over the years since, we've been able to bust our DD for drinking regular milk at a friend's house, or at school, because the bloating and constipation issues show up again. The cause and effect couldn't be more clear.

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    #143598 - 11/29/12 07:19 AM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: petunia]
    DeeDee Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/16/10
    Posts: 2498
    Originally Posted By: petunia
    Thanks. His problem behaviors only occur at home, though. Is it possible for him to compensate for these things in other environments? It seems if it were a food sensitivity, he'd have behavior issues across the board.


    I agree; it seems unlikely to me that these behaviors could be rooted in food intolerance.

    And I wouldn't go for dietary changes on my own; if you have reason to think there are gut issues (constipation, frequent diarrhea, reflux being some observable signs) you should talk to a doctor. Mum3's recommendations are very sound.

    DeeDee

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    #143610 - 11/29/12 08:22 AM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: petunia]
    polarbear Offline
    Member

    Registered: 09/29/11
    Posts: 3363
    Originally Posted By: petunia
    Thanks. His problem behaviors only occur at home, though. Is it possible for him to compensate for these things in other environments? It seems if it were a food sensitivity, he'd have behavior issues across the board. If you've read some of my other posts, you know I'm totally grasping at straws here.


    My 10 year old dd has a huge number of food allergies and sensitivities, and yes, they did impact her behavior when she was young and we hadn't fully figured out the full list of what she needed to avoid. However, there would have been no way she coud have held it together during a school day and then fallen apart at home..... and she has other very real and obvious social/medical symptoms. OTOH.... Just a small gotcha.... a food reaction that typically occurs, for instance 20 minutes after a chil eats when the food hits the stomach.. might not ever occur at school if the food that's the issue isn't being eaten at school.

    We untangled her food issues through several years of testing through doctors as well as paying close attention to what she ate and her reactions at home. If you have any concerns about possible food sensitivities, I'd recommend simplifying your child's diet (which is different than an elimination diet) and keeping a very close diary of foods eaten, behaviors noted and physical symptoms noted (hives, stomach pain, lethargy, coughing, throat feeling swollen, swollen facial features, odd bowel movements, stomach pain, constipation etc) PLUS the day/time OSHA eats and the day/time the reactions/behaviors occur. You also need to keep track of ingredients in things like toothpaste and inert ingredients in medicines etc. IF there is a food allergy or sensitivity, you'll eventually see patterns in the reactions.

    Re simplifying her diet, what I am referring to is not withholding any foods at first, but limiting the number of ingredients at each meal and limiting the amount of processed foods so that you can really see track and know what foods she's eating.

    I also want to add.... every food we saw a pattern with and were concerned about we followed up with allergy testing, which was without a doubt positive for our dd. In following online while wading through the years we spent testing and trialling foods I have read lots of stories of parents who were so desperately hoping for any kind of help with behavior that they easily fell into thinking it had to be food issues. I do think it's worth a close look through a food journal for anyone who has concerns, but I also think there is a lot of hype out there too so unless I was seeing some kind of correlation I wouldnt pursue it.

    Last thing I'll add... my dd also has a seizure disorder, and the first indication was in behavior. It was several years and only after her symptoms accelerated that we realized she was having seizures. There were indications of that in her food diaries but the issue wasn't related to food so we didn't catch it from the journals.... But I do think that keeping a detailed behavior journal might be helpful even if it's not food but something else driving the behaviors, when you're seeing differences in behavior at different times.

    Hope that helped a little bit, and made some sense!

    polarbear

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    #143613 - 11/29/12 08:34 AM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: Astroboy]
    petunia Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/17/11
    Posts: 146
    Hmmm... what kind of seizures, polarbear? What would I look for or ask the doctor about? Sounds like a need to attempt (again) a food diary.

    Sorry this is getting off topic.
    _________________________
    What I am is good enough, if I would only be it openly. ~Carl Rogers

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    #143664 - 11/29/12 01:07 PM Re: Gifted and gut issues/intolerances [Re: Astroboy]
    MumOfThree Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/11
    Posts: 1654
    Loc: Australia
    My kids are absolutely worse at home than school. They are better in both environments on the diet...

    And I strongly disagree with Polarbear about simplifying being enough. There are some foods where that may be suitable. But if you are looking for food chemical intolerance like salicylate and amine you have to know exactly what you are doing to be able find the pattern and simplification won't do it. Allergy leads to fairly immediate response so the simplification approach can work for allergy (as does allergy testing in most cases), intolerance is a load issue, the reaction may not be 20 mins after eating, it may be 3 days after eating an increased load of the chemical in question through a pattern of foods you are not aware all contain the same thing. We understand that if we've had a beer, a wine and a vodka that we have had 3 drinks with cumulative effect. That just one of those might have fairly minimal effect and that three is quite likely to have a noticable effect. We also know that some people are effected much faster than others by alcohol, but that everyone has a point at which they are overtly impacted. What people don't tend to be aware of is that cheese, chocolate and oranges all contain amines and someone with an amine problem might be fairly ok eating one of them but be extremely depressed (or badly behaved) if they eat all three.

    Also, intolerance may not come with obvious tummy upset.

    Also removing one thing at a time you risk the possibility that symptoms from a food still in your diet will be masking improvement from something that is an issue but is not the only issue or is not the worst issue.

    The first two weeks of an elimination diet is absolutely hellish. If it works you won't care and will be very motivated to continue. If it doesn't work it will be over fast and you'll never have to go there again.

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