Gifted Bulletin Board

Welcome to the Gifted Issues Discussion Forum.

We invite you to share your experiences and to post information about advocacy, research and other gifted education issues on this free public discussion forum.
CLICK HERE to Log In. Click here for the Board Rules.

Links
DITD Logo

Learn about the Davidson Academy’s online campus for profoundly gifted students living anywhere in the U.S.

The Davidson Institute for Talent Development is a national nonprofit dedicated to supporting profoundly gifted students through the following programs:

  • Davidson Fellows Scholarship
  • Davidson Young Scholars
  • Davidson Academy
  • THINK Summer Institute
  • DITD FaceBook   DITD Twitter   DITD YouTube
    The Davidson Institute is on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube!

    How gifted-friendly is
    your state?

    Subscribe to the Davidson Institute's eNews-Update

    Who's Online
    0 registered (), 0 Guests and 176 Spiders online.
    Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
    Newest Members
    Clara Tim, markhogue, John Henderson, wm97, oliviazimmerman
    10844 Registered Users
    October
    Su M Tu W Th F Sa
    1 2 3
    4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    11 12 13 14 15 16 17
    18 19 20 21 22 23 24
    25 26 27 28 29 30 31
    Page 128 of 263 < 1 2 ... 126 127 128 129 130 ... 262 263 >
    Topic Options
    #115980 - 11/10/11 07:27 AM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: 2giftgirls]
    epoh Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/31/11
    Posts: 954
    Loc: N. Texas
    Originally Posted By: 2giftgirls
    I just assume they can all completely understand what I'm saying and speak to them like I would any other person. We have a few "cute" words, mostly caused by the mouth that can't quite do what the brain wants (fagric for fabric, hangaburger and mazagine), but I never baby talk.


    My step-mother (the English teacher) is a HUGE fan of this and drilled it into my head when I was pregnant. We never baby talked to our kids. I always spoke in complete sentences and would correct mis-pronounced words.

    Also, it's not normal for 2yr olds to use complete sentences? LoL
    _________________________
    ~amy

    Top
    #115986 - 11/10/11 08:10 AM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: 2giftgirls]
    Lori H. Offline
    Member

    Registered: 05/26/07
    Posts: 982
    My two year old great niece talks a lot, just like my son did at her age, and has been using complete sentences for a while now. At a recent family gathering my niece told me that her daughter's pediatrician said her verbal ability was advanced and she had also noticed a difference between her daughter's verbal ability and that of the other kids her age in the daycare. My cousin's wife, who overheard this, said "oh that's just normal" but I don't remember her kids talking like that at two although they are bright and very athletic. My niece will have to learn to make sure nobody else is listening to her talk about her daughter's abilities. The only ability that is socially acceptable to talk about here is sports ability.

    Top
    #115989 - 11/10/11 08:29 AM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: CFK]
    Dude Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/04/11
    Posts: 2856
    We found a *little* baby talk to be VERY helpful early on.

    We carried on normal, adult conversations with DD as a baby all the time, and we found that within the first 4-6 months, she started picking up her own words... and they were typically baby versions of the words we were using, because she was struggling with the linguistics, as early speakers do. When she was thirsty, she would ask for "juice," so that was easy, but most of her other words were of the "ma-ma," "da-da," "nite-nite," "tub-tub" variety. We gave her "nite-nite," but we always rephrased ourselves in both baby and grown-up terms: "Awww, are you tired? Ready to go to sleep? To go nite-nite?" "Tub-tub" was something she came up with independently, derived from a silly song I made up for bath time.

    As I've mentioned before elsewhere, by the time she was six months old, she had a word for everything she needed, and if there was a word she lacked for something she wanted, she'd just point and say, "That!" and if we still couldn't figure it out, we'd say, "Show me," and she'd get as close to it as she could, still pointing, and we'd pick her up and move her closer to it if necessary (because "that" might be cookies in a high cupboard, or a toy in her bedroom upstairs), until we finally understood what she was pointing at.

    The one exception was she still didn't have a word that said, "I'm hungry." When she was 8 or 9 months old this was resolved, when my mom started babysitting on a regular basis, and she'd sit there baby-talking all the way through a feeding, saying, "Mmmm... num-num!" over and over again.

    All these baby words made things SOOOOO much more peaceful in our home. And if DD said, "Mama, num-num," and DW responded, "You're hungry?", she was learning proper speech while still being able to communicate her needs. So it doesn't really have to be an all-or-nothing approach.

    Top
    #116018 - 11/10/11 03:23 PM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: CFK]
    2giftgirls Offline
    Member

    Registered: 09/26/11
    Posts: 342
    Loc: So Cal
    oh, well we had some of that too Dude, when you put it that way. We used "num-nums" for all food, bottle, breast and foods when they started, snacks, etc...but also, like you are saying, you're using "regular words" then the cute "baby" word. A few of the mispronunciations we let slide too because they were just cute, especially when jumbled up in a more advanced sentance.
    It also sounds like you were very tuned in to what she needed and was trying to communicate to you. That's special smile Not all parents are "listening", kwim?
    _________________________
    I get excited when the library lets me know my books are ready for pickup...

    Top
    #116300 - 11/15/11 08:37 AM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: CFK]
    Austin Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/25/08
    Posts: 1840
    Loc: North Texas
    We found out from Mr W's piano teacher than Mr W (3y10m) can sight read most simple songs including the lyrics.



    Edited by Austin (11/15/11 08:37 AM)

    Top
    #116304 - 11/15/11 09:11 AM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: herenow]
    Austin Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/25/08
    Posts: 1840
    Loc: North Texas
    Originally Posted By: herenow
    Originally Posted By: bgbarnes
    He answered that it looked like a scythe. The teacher did not know what it was, had to write it down and look it up


    lol. I think that should be an automatic "admit". smile


    I agree!

    http://www.lost-civilizations.net/scythians.html

    Don't make the Scythian mommas mad at you.

    Quote:
    It has been recorded that Scythian women had to kill three enemies in battle before marrying




    Edited by Austin (11/15/11 09:11 AM)

    Top
    #116305 - 11/15/11 09:14 AM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: 2giftgirls]
    Dude Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/04/11
    Posts: 2856
    Originally Posted By: 2giftgirls
    oh, well we had some of that too Dude, when you put it that way. We used "num-nums" for all food, bottle, breast and foods when they started, snacks, etc...but also, like you are saying, you're using "regular words" then the cute "baby" word. A few of the mispronunciations we let slide too because they were just cute, especially when jumbled up in a more advanced sentance.
    It also sounds like you were very tuned in to what she needed and was trying to communicate to you. That's special smile Not all parents are "listening", kwim?


    DW and I were just discussing yesterday how special her early malapropisms are to us, and we try to keep them alive. They became a part of our own lexicon.

    The weirdest one was this sound she made in the back of her throat VERY early (like 2 months or so), something like, "gnnn-gnnn." We assumed this was her way of saying she was tired, because anytime she made this noise, we'd hand her her blankie, she'd seize it and curl up, and if we were home, we'd put her to bed, with no fuss. Fast forward a year and a half, and she stunned me with this phrase, "Dada! Where gnnn-gnnn go?" It turned out that "gnnn-gnnn" was the blankie all along. Looking back, I'd have to say that makes it her first "word," beating "Dood-le-bop!" by approximately a month and a half.

    She still has one of her two original gnnn-gnnns, which she keeps in her bed amid that mass of blankets, pillows, and stuffed animals she sleeps among. We told her about the story, she laughed, and began referring to that particular blanket as her gnnn-gnnn. And so it lives on.

    Meanwhile, we're in a house where the adults announce the need to "peepee potty!" and prepare "monkey and cheese."

    Top
    #116403 - 11/16/11 02:52 PM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: La Texican]
    Rocky Offline
    Junior Member

    Registered: 12/21/10
    Posts: 37
    I'm sorry La Texican. I am a bit confused. I thought you were just being a bit sarcastic about echolalia because someone had made a snide comment about her. It's obvious that the kids understand conversations at that age it's great that she can tell you what's on her mind.

    Anyway congratulations on Espers first sentences.

    DS7 first said Mommy and Daddy at 7 months. We tried to teach him signs, but he never picked up more than 3 or 4 because at 10 months most anyone could understand him.

    Top
    #116466 - 11/17/11 10:46 AM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: master of none]
    herenow Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/12/11
    Posts: 433
    Loc: on the learning curve
    Originally Posted By: master of none
    My dysgraphic son got his report card and one of the teachers commented "he is a gifted writer".


    Excellent! smile

    Top
    #116474 - 11/17/11 11:53 AM Re: The ultimate brag thread [Re: CFK]
    1111 Offline
    Member

    Registered: 08/26/11
    Posts: 246
    I am warped...What would be a "complete sentence"? DS 23 months said a couple of weeks age "No shoes in granny's house". Would this be a complete sentence? I am thinking full on conversation is not normal, but that a simple sentence like that IS. He is almost 2...DS4 would say 5-6 word sentences when turning 2 as well. I thought that would be pretty average or just slightly above....?

    Top
    Page 128 of 263 < 1 2 ... 126 127 128 129 130 ... 262 263 >


    Moderator:  M-Moderator 
    Recent Posts
    Full time in person learning-accommodati
    on for ADD

    by aeh
    Yesterday at 12:28 PM
    Grading practices
    by aeh
    10/18/20 12:49 PM
    The Politics of Gifted Education
    by Eagle Mum
    10/18/20 05:42 AM
    How can teachers challenge a more academically adv
    by Kai
    10/17/20 07:16 PM
    Montessori vs. dedicated gifted school
    by ojojojoj
    10/14/20 09:28 AM
    Davidson Institute Twitter