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    #11621 - 03/15/08 09:13 PM Two Year Olds Explained
    Ann Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/15/08
    Posts: 179
    Loc: painting the dining room
    Can someone please help me understand why DS2…
    1. starts screeching and wailing a fraction of a second after something doesn’t “work” (e.g. he can’t get something closed, put back together, unstuck, etc. faster than you can read the word “now”).
    2. tells me which hand I’m supposed to use to run his train cars along the tracks (I’m supposed to use my left hand and I’m right handed… don’t even think about using your right hand or you’ll get corrected). There are several circumstances where DS2 has a particular way things have to be done.

    Is there an age that the hysterics subside? cry

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    #11624 - 03/15/08 09:19 PM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: Ann]
    Grinity Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/13/05
    Posts: 7207
    Loc: Connecticut
    LOL - my mom would scream and then hold her breath and turn blue at 6 months old if my gramma didn't shovel the food in fast enough. Lots of gifted folks, and not always the most unusually gifted ones, have this thing call overexcitabilities, called OEs for short. Apparently that's just the way some of us are wired.

    FWIW, my mom did grow up to be a very determined woman, and not any sign of mental illness in her at all.

    Usually when the child can communicate, they stop wailing over every little thing, but it's slow and takes time. Is he much of a talker? My son learned the babysign for more at daycare, and it helped him get his point accross.

    Smiles,
    Grinity
    _________________________
    Coaching available, at SchoolSuccessSolutions.com

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    #11628 - 03/15/08 09:39 PM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: Grinity]
    Ann Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/15/08
    Posts: 179
    Loc: painting the dining room
    Originally Posted By: Grinity
    LOL - my mom would scream and then hold her breath and turn blue at 6 months old if my gramma didn't shovel the food in fast enough. Lots of gifted folks, and not always the most unusually gifted ones, have this thing call overexcitabilities, called OEs for short. Apparently that's just the way some of us are wired.

    FWIW, my mom did grow up to be a very determined woman, and not any sign of mental illness in her at all.

    Usually when the child can communicate, they stop wailing over every little thing, but it's slow and takes time. Is he much of a talker? My son learned the babysign for more at daycare, and it helped him get his point accross.

    Smiles,
    Grinity


    Your poor Gramma shoveling at lightening speed to abate the bluish-hue. smile

    Fingers crossed there will be no mental illness w/ DS. One can hope.

    That's the odd thing; his verbal skills are very good. However, DS2 still gets written up at school. It's not uncommon for DS's teachers to write home that DS2 is either "not using his nice hands with his friends" or "not using his listening ears with his teachers". That's not to say that all days are like this. On Friday one of his 2 teachers was gone and apparently DS was very helpful to the remaining teacher. >shrug<


    Edited by Ann (03/15/08 09:44 PM)

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    #11629 - 03/15/08 09:54 PM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: Ann]
    acs Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/05/07
    Posts: 797
    Remember that 2 year olds are very sensitive to stressful events in the family. They can feel things aren't right but lack the outlets to express it "appropriately." Do the folks at school know that the family is having a rough patch?

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    #11630 - 03/15/08 10:01 PM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: acs]
    Ann Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/15/08
    Posts: 179
    Loc: painting the dining room
    The folks at school don't know. DH is very private. I'll have to start paying attention to see if things at school parallel DH's cycles. Interesting thought Acs.

    We try very hard to keep DS2 unaware, but I imagine he could sense something is amiss even if he doesn't understand it.

    Items 1&2 in my initial post have been going on for a long time. I can't remember if they happened before DS2 turned one though.

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    #11631 - 03/15/08 10:14 PM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: Ann]
    acs Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/05/07
    Posts: 797
    Play therapy can be really fun at this age. We used to use DS's stuffed animals to set up a little situation. For example, when DS was switching schools (he was a bit older than your DS), we took a little dolphin toy. I read his tag, "Wow," I said, " Dolphie was made in China. China is a long way from here. How do you think Dolphie felt right before he left all his old friend to come to America?" And DS told me how scared Dolphie was and worried and excited. And I knew that was how DS felt, but DS didn't know we'd done therapy.

    You could take for example a mommy dinosaur, a daddy dinosaur, and a "baby" dinosaur and see what he does with his "family." Ask him questions about why they are doing what they are doing. You might see patterns: Does daddy go to the hospital? Does he sleep a lot? Does mommy cry or yell? Just watch and ask a few questions and you should be able to discern a lot about what matters to him right now and what he is noticing. They are pretty transparent at this age. You just have to get down on the floor and relax and listen.

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    #11632 - 03/15/08 10:22 PM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: acs]
    acs Offline
    Member

    Registered: 03/05/07
    Posts: 797
    Oh, and two-year-old know when their mother is upset. It's a survival skill!

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    #11642 - 03/16/08 06:27 AM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: acs]
    Lorel Offline
    Member

    Registered: 08/22/07
    Posts: 970
    Loc: New England
    If anyone wants to read some good stories involving play therapy, look up author Virgina Axline. She wrote "Dibs in Search of Self" among others, a book about her experiences as therapist to a highly gifted young boy. I'd forgotten about it until acs just mentioned play therapy... I read it many years ago.

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    #11647 - 03/16/08 07:18 AM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: Lorel]
    Kriston Offline
    Member

    Registered: 09/19/07
    Posts: 6145
    Loc: Midwest
    If it helps, my 3yo is still doing pretty much the same thing your 2yo is, Ann, and we do not have bipolar issues (or any other such dignosis) in our house.

    I think watching out for connections to DH's condition is smart, but I'm not 100% convinced you'll see those connections. GT kids tend to be bossy little perfectionists. If things don't go their way, they throw tantrums.

    Case in point: THREE kids in an enrichment class I teach for GT kids on Saturdays threw tantrums when things in the game we were playing didn't go their way. They were 6-9yos! So being a bossy, cranky perfectionist at 2yo is sort of to be expected, I think.

    I guess what I'm saying is that it may just be part of the normal development of your child. I could be wrong, so watch for signs that it's something more, but I wouldn't be too worried about it unless DS2 acts out more obviously. But what you're describing now, Ann, just sounds like a day in the life of a GT kid to me! smile
    _________________________
    Kriston
    Mom to DS13 and DS10

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    #11649 - 03/16/08 07:37 AM Re: Two Year Olds Explained [Re: Kriston]
    LMom Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/14/07
    Posts: 902
    Originally Posted By: Kriston
    If it helps, my 3yo is still doing pretty much the same thing your 2yo is, Ann, and we do not have bipolar issues (or any other such dignosis) in our house.

    I guess what I'm saying is that it may just be part of the normal development of your child. I could be wrong, so watch for signs that it's something more, but I wouldn't be too worried about it unless DS2 acts out more obviously. But what you're describing now, Ann, just sounds like a day in the life of a GT kid to me! smile


    Same here. DS3 has been the same way for very long time. It's actually not as bad anymore, but he used to be a real pain. He is the kind of child who will try to make you redo the whole thing just to have it his way. If you refuse he will throw a huge tantrum. He will do anything to have his way.

    Fortunately we don't have any problems in school. He saves it all for home.
    _________________________
    LMom

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