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    #103005 - 05/22/11 05:05 AM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: Wren]
    kcab Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/02/07
    Posts: 1603
    Loc: Sparta, apparently
    Came across an article in a news aggregator that perhaps fits in this thread:

    17 year old graduating from HS and Yale

    I thought it was a nice article and an interesting blending of traditional paths into something unusual. (Plus some non-traditional things, like one-on-one talking to HS teachers/faculty too.) Also, I had no idea that this particular program existed at Yale, or rather, hadn't thought about programs for non-traditional students being applicable to young students. (I know, Duh!) In fact, at one point I was tempted to post something about some schools being focused on graduation w/in 4 years, as I thought that might be less appealing for very young students. So much for that - glad to see this article.
    _________________________
    kcab

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    #103047 - 05/22/11 01:49 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: Wren]
    Wren Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/14/08
    Posts: 1600
    thanks Kcab. Couple of points I noted, since we have had posts debate. I read it was his teacher in second grade that pushed the radical acceleration to high school, not the parents. I had mentioned when you have high end PG, usually the system takes care of it before the parents.

    And, since we talked about differences for college. He left Fairfield U, because it was too easy, and opted for Yale.

    And when you are extreme, it is a great outcome. When you are high end but not in those extremes, it is harder to get the programs necessary.

    Ren


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    #103049 - 05/22/11 02:21 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: CFK]
    passthepotatoes Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/09
    Posts: 687
    Originally Posted By: CFK


    Or could it be that things usually only work out this well (and you hear about it) when the schools are also involved and onboard? When it's not just the parents involved? Could there possibly be ten other extreme kids for everyone like this you hear about who were unable to get the radical acceleration they needed for this kind of outcome?

    I think you have too much faith in the "system".



    I agree. What I see in the posted article is a kid who had the good fortune have a highly supportive and aware family AND a school system that was flexible AND he lived in an area with college options. Great outcome for him... but sadly I know there are other kids out there with this kind of talent who aren't being recognized and aren't getting the adapted education that they need.


    Edited by passthepotatoes (05/22/11 02:43 PM)

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    #103052 - 05/22/11 04:37 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: Wren]
    Wren Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/14/08
    Posts: 1600
    You say could? But statiscally, does anyone know what 180 IQ looks like in decimal places? Maybe there are, maybe there aren't. You have that kid at Hunter. He is one in a school for gifted with 200 kids per year and 7th through 12th grade. They found one in the sample set where most highly gifted kids in a city of 8 million try for spots in 7th grade.

    Ren

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    #103056 - 05/22/11 04:59 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: passthepotatoes]
    kcab Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/02/07
    Posts: 1603
    Loc: Sparta, apparently
    When I read the article, I see the parents playing a fairly large role. Sounds like they took the lead during 2nd grade, going the mentor route, and were fortunate enough to have a classroom teacher who agreed with them and helped advocate with the district.

    I'm not sure about about ratio of unaccommodated need to appropriately accommodated. I'm sure there are kids like this throughout the country who *don't* have newspaper articles written on them. Plus lots of other individual solutions to similar problems, some better than others. To me, the more relevant question was, how many other kids are there regionally who might benefit from some subset of these accommodations? And how many teachers are there who might read an article like that and think, "hmmm, maybe xyz could do something like this?"
    _________________________
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    #103057 - 05/22/11 05:00 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: Wren]
    passthepotatoes Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/09
    Posts: 687
    Originally Posted By: Wren
    You say could? But statiscally, does anyone know what 180 IQ looks like in decimal places? Maybe there are, maybe there aren't. You have that kid at Hunter. He is one in a school for gifted with 200 kids per year and 7th through 12th grade. They found one in the sample set where most highly gifted kids in a city of 8 million try for spots in 7th grade.

    Ren


    Was I the "you" in this post?
    I'm not sure I follow what you are saying. Are you wondering whether there are other students this gifted?
    Yes, there are. I do not believe all of them have been correctly identified or that their educational needs are met. Some kids who are very gifted look more like troublemakers or they misdiagnosed with disorders like autism to oppositional defiance.

    I'd suggest reading the Miraca Gross's book on highly gifted children. Also, the Davidson's book Genius Denied may also be helpful in providing understanding that it is not the case that the "system" always identifies and helps PG kids.

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    #103065 - 05/22/11 05:52 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: Wren]
    Wren Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/14/08
    Posts: 1600
    I think it was someone else that suggested there could be 10 others not identified for everyone that is.

    I have read both books Potatoes. And I still think when you have a "little man Tate", it is different than a PG kid with an IQ of 150-160. And that was my point.

    It would be interesting to find out about the GIGA society, I think that is their name and find out if they were all identified young.

    Ren

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    #103067 - 05/22/11 06:09 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: Wren]
    Wren Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/14/08
    Posts: 1600
    It seems that 180-190 would be one in a million depending on the ceilings. So you could have 300 in the US but that would be at each age level. Based on the curve, you could have 3-5 in each grade, statiscally, in the US.

    Ren

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    #103068 - 05/22/11 06:14 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: Wren]
    passthepotatoes Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/09
    Posts: 687
    Originally Posted By: Wren


    I have read both books Potatoes. And I still think when you have a "little man Tate", it is different than a PG kid with an IQ of 150-160. And that was my point.



    It sort of seems like you are assuming that if kids are super PG then everyone notices and it all works out. If you've read the two books I mentioned you will find several examples where that was not the case. It is not at all fair to assume that every "Little Man Tate" looks like a genius. In the wrong environment with the wrong supports he may just look like total brats or like they are nuts.

    If your example is Hunter - well yes, they I think we can feel pretty confident they will know it when they see it. If you are talking about a kid with the same kind of intelligence born to a working class minority family in a rural area or maybe a kid who is disabled in some way. Then, no it may well go without detection or without being addressed appropriately.

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    #103069 - 05/22/11 06:16 PM Re: Rapid Acceleration [Re: Wren]
    passthepotatoes Offline
    Member

    Registered: 04/07/09
    Posts: 687
    Originally Posted By: Wren
    It seems that 180-190 would be one in a million depending on the ceilings. So you could have 300 in the US but that would be at each age level. Based on the curve, you could have 3-5 in each grade, statiscally, in the US.

    Ren


    I don't have a link handy, but hopefully someone else does. There is some thought that there are bubbles at both end of the normal bell curve. There certainly seem to be more children out at the right end of the curve than we'd expect statistically.

    At any rate, we probably should not talk in terms of those old IQ numbers because it is confusing as there are no accurate current tests that use that scale and no real way to differentiate that through IQ testing.

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