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    #102387 - 05/14/11 11:38 PM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: HowlerKarma]
    Giftodd Offline
    Member

    Registered: 10/25/10
    Posts: 221
    Loc: Australia
    Originally Posted By: HowlerKarma
    Originally Posted By: CFK
    Originally Posted By: passthepotatoes
    Originally Posted By: Giftodd


    One of the things I was horrified by when I became a parent was that people were so judgemental of each other and with so little appareciation that we're all, really, making it up as we go along.


    At least there is much less of this in real life. Part of why this thread has been interesting to me is that this sort of negative stuff isn't something that seems to happen in real life a lot. So, I'd hate for anyone considering the early college option to fear that you will be confronted with negative comments all the time. If it is truly the right path for your child it will be obvious to the people who know them in real life. And, then you will be more likely to hear something like "It must have been rough to be confronted with the need to make these decisions, but you handled it well."



    I agree. Ironically the only naysayers I have encountered about decisions I have made for my son have been on this board. For people that know my child, there is usually no problem understanding why we do what we do.


    This has generally been our experience, as well. People who actually KNOW our child (and us) think that we are very much rational and pretty conscientious without being terribly push-oriented. At least not more than is warranted by her particular blend of personality characteristics.


    Sorry, just thought I touch in here - I didn't mean to imply that people in real life were judging early college entry decisions - just that when I first became a parent I was shocked at how much parents judged eachother (breastfeeding, bottle feding, routines, attachment parenting, controlled crying, red-shirting, extra-curricular choices etc - you're always doing the wrong thing according to someone, when really most everyone is just trying to do their best). Apologies for any confusion!
    _________________________
    "If children have interest, then education will follow" - Arthur C Clarke

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    #102388 - 05/15/11 01:08 AM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: CFK]
    Dandy Offline
    Member

    Registered: 08/12/08
    Posts: 574
    Originally Posted By: CFK
    Originally Posted By: Wren
    Does radical acceleration limit a child's options in the long run?

    I don't look at it that way. Here's the way I look at it: whether or not radical acceleration limits my child's options, he has no choice. {...] He is who he is.

    Originally Posted By: CFK
    Do I believe radically accelerating him will limit him? No. Holding him back in school or not allowing him to learn would have limited him.

    DS's school had open house this week, and after visiting his 6th grade classroom we stopped by his old 3rd & 4th grade classrooms where his same-age peers are this year. I can't even begin to contemplate life for him in either of those classrooms. This serves as a keenly pointed reminder of why we choose grade-skipping for the kid. We'll deal with college when we have to, but for now we had no other viable option.
    _________________________
    Being offended is a natural consequence of leaving the house. - Fran Lebowitz

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    #102407 - 05/15/11 10:37 AM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: Val]
    LilMick Offline
    Member

    Registered: 08/11/08
    Posts: 160
    Loc: Florida
    Thankfully, this didn't come up for DC20 or DC17. I'm not sure either of them would have been ready for living away from home without a structured program like PEG.

    My own experiences were pretty good overall--much better than being at grade level (alternated homeschool and traditional school at grade level depending on where we were living at the time). Rather than leave home before 18, I audited classes at the local university (no credit, so I could stay a freshman for scholarship purposes later), attended weekly department lectures, and did research (started around 10). It really helped me to keep going intellectually without having to move away/give up scholarships/pick a career that early. Around 15, I started shadowing, doing more substantial research, and interning away from home for a few weeks a year (on my own or staying with family).

    It was a good set-up for full-time enrollment in my later teens, as I was able to pass out of most introductory classes/some upper division classes and take a wider variety of classes at a higher level without giving up scholarships and a chance to attend a rigorous college.

    As for MD-only and MD/PhD programs, I'm in an MD/PhD program right now. My medical school class had some kids as young as 19 or 20 when we started medical school, some of whom had taken a year or two off after college to gain more clinical experiences (problems volunteering during college due to young age). It seems to have worked out well for them, and they will still be able to finish medical school relatively early.

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    #102409 - 05/15/11 11:29 AM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: LilMick]
    Bostonian Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/14/10
    Posts: 2601
    Loc: MA
    Originally Posted By: LilMick


    As for MD-only and MD/PhD programs, I'm in an MD/PhD program right now. My medical school class had some kids as young as 19 or 20 when we started medical school, some of whom had taken a year or two off after college to gain more clinical experiences (problems volunteering during college due to young age). It seems to have worked out well for them, and they will still be able to finish medical school relatively early.


    Kids are typically almost 6yo when they enter 1st grade and thus 22 = 6 + 12 + 4 years old if they start medical school immediately after college. One MD/PhD program http://www.umassmed.edu/mdphd/academics/faqs.aspx says student typically finish in 7-8 years, which would put them close to 30. One reason I support acceleration and early college is that
    highly gifted students will often pursue graduate degrees, and I think they should be working, marrying, and (maybe) having children before they are 30 years old.
    _________________________
    "To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle." - George Orwell

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    #102411 - 05/15/11 11:36 AM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: Dottie]
    Grinity Offline
    Member

    Registered: 12/13/05
    Posts: 7207
    Loc: Connecticut
    Originally Posted By: Dottie
    But he does have a few teachers here and a handful of students who are excited with him, and so far...this has been enough. The kid is finally showing some HG+ passion, and it's both exhilarating and terrifying.

    Wow that's wonderful to hear Dottie-Dear!
    Yippee!
    Grinity
    _________________________
    Coaching available, at SchoolSuccessSolutions.com

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    #102413 - 05/15/11 12:27 PM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: Val]
    Wren Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/14/08
    Posts: 1579
    Gosh Bostonian. We've had enough stridency on this topic already, don't start going

    "they should be working, marrying, and (maybe) having children before they are 30 years old."

    said with a smile.

    Ren

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    #102414 - 05/15/11 12:44 PM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: Wren]
    Bostonian Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/14/10
    Posts: 2601
    Loc: MA
    Originally Posted By: Wren
    Gosh Bostonian. We've had enough stridency on this topic already, don't start going

    "they should be working, marrying, and (maybe) having children before they are 30 years old."

    said with a smile.

    Ren


    Well, I do strongly believe that people should be entering the "real world" before age 30 and will guide my children accordingly. I put my son in KG at 4 and will put my daughter in KG at age 4.7 partly for this reason -- they will each by saving a year, the way I look at it.


    _________________________
    "To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle." - George Orwell

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    #102433 - 05/16/11 06:15 AM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: Val]
    CFK Offline
    Member

    Registered: 06/21/07
    Posts: 906
    Loc: in an alternate universe
    Here's how this parent solved some of the issues of early college:

    http://www.kget.com/news/local/story/Loc...6x4n58y1_g.cspx

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    #102452 - 05/16/11 08:17 AM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: Val]
    Wren Offline
    Member

    Registered: 01/14/08
    Posts: 1579
    But I do not understand why she is going to Cal State Bakerfield next and then to law school? Why not to law school now?

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    #102456 - 05/16/11 09:15 AM Re: Very young HS grads. What next? [Re: Wren]
    Bostonian Offline
    Member

    Registered: 02/14/10
    Posts: 2601
    Loc: MA
    Originally Posted By: Wren
    But I do not understand why she is going to Cal State Bakerfield next and then to law school? Why not to law school now?


    In the U.S. law schools require incoming students to have a B.A. or B.S. degree, and they weight college grades heavily in admissions. So do medical schools, although there are a handful of 6-year medical programs not following a 4+4 schedule.

    Someone who does not understand the basics of the how the American educational/credentialing system works needs to do some background reading.

    I do NOT think aspiring lawyers and doctors should be forced to spend 4 years getting a B.A. before professional school, but I have not been made king yet.

    _________________________
    "To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle." - George Orwell

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